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I,m so freaken frustrated!!!.someone please help.

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I,m so freaken frustrated!!!.someone please help.

Posted by Tony on July 19, 2001 at 14:07:31:

OK i will make this short .i.m 32 and have very oily skin
which makes me break out all the time..Now i take accutane
the oil stops and my skin is fine, i stop accutane the oil comes back and its break outs all over the place..What can i do to slow down the oil, i don,t enjoy taking accutane for this but its the only thing that works..all you guys that are agianst accutane don,t blast me because i hate the drug to...but what can i do...Is it hormones?? or could i just have large oil glands and i,m stuck with this?.
All the SR in the world won,t stop the oil...
please give me something that might help.
Thanks.



Re: I,m so freaken frustrated!!!.someone please help.

Posted by Sally on July 19, 2001 at 14:56:22:

In Reply to: I,m so freaken frustrated!!!.someone please help. posted by Tony on July 19, 2001 at 14:07:31:

Tony, I feel your pain. Have you posted before? We have had a lot of acne questions this month. People have tried B-5 (Pantothenic Acid up to ten grams a day which is twenty 500 mg pills, half of it twice a day). Some people like it, some don't, was that you that said it didn't work? Some say it's because your system isn't handling fats or oils very well so Dr. Stoll suggests Omega Oils as a supplement. It makes the sebum less hard and that is one reason it clogs up pores. There is a topic on "essential oils" which discusses the omegas. Someone else said egg yolk mask helps them and there was another suggestion the other day but can't recall it right now. And then there is the stress thing. There's a thread about that from a couple of days ago. You belong to a large club, sorry.

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Re: I,m so freaken frustrated!!!.someone please help...ANY MORE HELP OUT THERE?.nmi

Posted by Tony on July 20, 2001 at 15:20:45:

In Reply to: I,m so freaken frustrated!!!.someone please help. posted by Tony on July 19, 2001 at 14:07:31:

nm

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Have you tried Jojoba Oil?

Posted by Jeannie on July 20, 2001 at 15:36:39:

In Reply to: I,m so freaken frustrated!!!.someone please help. posted by Tony on July 19, 2001 at 14:07:31:

Hi Tony,

Okay. I haven't tried it for that long myself - but I have read about it and it seems to work for many people with "shiny" faces. Supposedly, a little bit of jojoba oil on your face will trick your skin into thinking it has produced enough sebum. The jojoba oil doesn't look anything like the oil your own face produces, so your face doesn't look shiny. I've tried it at night time and it really seems to work. But, I'm doing some Vitamin E cream right now (to really give my skin a beauty treatment) so I haven't had the opportunity to really have a long trial period with the jojoba oil. I know it doesn't make you break out, just like Tea Tree Oil doesn't either.

Anyway, you can try it and tell us how it works. And if you want, try some Witch Hazel as astringent every night and morning -- it has low alcohol content so it doesn't dry your face, but it keeps oil under control.

Good luck!
Jeannie

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well don't be freaken frustrated! Look at your options...

Posted by PeterB on July 20, 2001 at 17:55:12:

In Reply to: I,m so freaken frustrated!!!.someone please help. posted by Tony on July 19, 2001 at 14:07:31:

Auravita.com claims that tea leaf oil is the most proven effective alternative treatment for adult acne. Here is a reprint from their profile of all treatment options (holistic):

...Acne occurs most commonly in teenagers and to a lesser extent in young adults. The condition results in part from excessive stimulation of the skin by androgens (male hormones). Bacterial infection of the skin also appears to play a role.

Dietary changes that may be helpful: Many people assume certain aspects of diet are linked to acne, but there isn’t much evidence. Preliminary research found chocolate was not implicated, for example.1 Similarly, though a diet high in iodine can create an acne-like rash in a few people, this is rarely the cause of acne. In a preliminary study, people who thought that certain foods triggered their acne turned out to be consistently wrong.2 Despite the lack of evidence, some doctors continue to believe that food allergy can play a role, at least in adult acne.3

Nutritional supplements that may be helpful: Several studies indicate that zinc supplements reduce the severity of acne.4 In one study, zinc was found to be as effective as oral antibiotic therapy.5 Doctors sometimes suggest that people with acne take 30 mg of zinc two or three times per day for a few months, then 30 mg per day thereafter. It often takes 12 weeks before any improvement is seen.

Large quantities of vitamin A—such as 300,000 IU per day for females and 400–500,000 IU per day for males—have been used successfully to treat severe acne.6 However, those quantities of vitamin A are quite toxic. Moreover, unlike the permanent actions of synthetic prescription versions of vitamin A (such as isotretinoin - Accutane®), the acne will return several months after real vitamin A is discontinued. Therefore, vitamin A is generally a poor treatment for acne and should be taken only under the supervision of a health professional, if at all.

A topical preparation of retinaldehyde (a prescription form of vitamin A) may be effective in mild rosacea (an inflammatory form of acne). In an un-blinded trial, women with rosacea used a retinaldehyde cream (0.05%) once daily for 6 months.7 Inflammation was improved in approximately 75% of participants after 5 months. Blood vessel abnormalities responded in 46% of cases after 6 months, but the improvement did not reach statistical significance, due to the small size of the study. Retinaldehyde cream is available by prescription only and should be used only under the supervision of a doctor.

An isolated trial using pantothenic acid reported good results.8 In that trial, people with acne were given 2.5 grams of pantothenic acid four times per day (for a total of 10 grams per day)—a remarkably high amount. A cream containing 20% pantothenic acid was also applied topically four to six times per day. With moderate acne, near-complete relief was seen within two months, but severe conditions took at least six months to respond. Eventually, the level of pantothenic acid was reduced to 1–5 grams per day—still a very high level.

Niacinamide was found to substantially help people with acne in a double-blind trial lasting two months and using topical gel containing 4% niacinamide applied twice per day.9 There is little reason to believe the vitamin would have similar actions if taken orally, however.

Vitamin B6 at 50 mg per day may alleviate premenstrual flare-ups of acne experienced by some women.10

Are there any side effects or interactions? Refer to the individual supplement for information about any side effects or interactions.

Herbs that may be helpful: A large study compared the topical use of 5% tea tree oil to 5% benzoyl peroxide for common acne. Although the tea tree oil was slower and less potent in its action, it had far fewer side effects and was thus considered more effective overall.11 For topical treatment of acne, the oil may be used at a dilution of 5–15%.

Historically, tonic or alterative herbs, such as burdock, have been used in the treatment of skin conditions. These herbs are believed to have a cleansing action when taken internally.12 Burdock root tincture may be taken in 2–4 ml amounts per day. Dried root preparations in a capsule or tablet can be used at 1–2 grams three times per day. Many herbal preparations combine burdock root with other alterative herbs, such as yellow dock, red clover, or cleavers.

Some older German literature suggests that agnus castus might contribute to clearing of premenstrual acne, possibly via modulation of hormonal influences on acne.13 Women in these studies used forty drops of a concentrated liquid product once daily.14

Are there any side effects or interactions? Refer to the individual herb for information about any side effects or interactions.

Other integrative approaches that may be helpful: Acupuncture may be helpful in the treatment of acne. Several uncontrolled studies have reported that a series of acupuncture treatments (eight to 15), is markedly effective or curative in 90–98% of patients.15 16 17 Besides traditional Chinese acupuncture using needles alone, a technique called “cupping” is frequently used in the treatment of acne. Cupping refers to the use of cup-shaped instruments to apply suction to the area being needled. Two uncontrolled trials of cupping treatment for acne reported marked improvement in 91–96% of the study participants.18 19 Controlled trials are necessary to determine the true efficacy of acupuncture and other traditional Chinese therapies in the treatment of acne.

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Re: I,m so freaken frustrated!!!.someone please help. (Archive in acne.)

Posted by Walt Stoll on July 21, 2001 at 09:24:18:

In Reply to: I,m so freaken frustrated!!!.someone please help. posted by Tony on July 19, 2001 at 14:07:31:

Tony,

Your note exposes your ignorance. Ignorance is curable by learning. YOUR learning, not someone else's.

If you studied stress-effect storage and the effect of SR, you would not make such a foolish statement.

For example, essential fatty acids make your skin LESS oily, not more. That is not logical either unless you know how they DO that.

Walt

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