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Chest Pain post heart-attack

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Chest Pain post heart-attack

Posted by Jan on June 23, 2002 at 05:38:33:

I am asking these questions for my husband who had a mild heart attack last month and is starting chelation and wellness measures. I am writing this because he hates writing!!

He had his first chelation Friday. He still has continuing, intermittent mild chest pain most days which he describes as "weird."

The doc says even if you are not sure it is angina, take the nitro anyway. Take it every 5 minutes and if after 3 doses (15 min.) the pain is still not gone, go to the hospital.

Fine, but he's not sure if the pain is truly "gone." After taking the nitro, it may go away for a half hour, then come back. Or else it goes away for 3 minutes and then comes back very mildly, then goes away. Nebulous stuff like that. The pain is not very severe either, and he says it is a lot like pectoral muscle pain (which it realistically could be, from his job) but he says it is has other odd aspects unlike pec pain. For the last week, he has been having this going on intermittently. The nitro seems to help, but the action of the nitro is just not that clear-cut with respect to the pain.

Also worrisome: he seems to think he has "atypical angina". As gleaned from his reading, typical angina comes predictably upon exertion; atypical is unpredictable and sporadic - and considered to be more dangerous. Question #1: Is this accurate in your experience?

Meanwhile, the pains today were a bit worse than on previous days. So, Question #2: Do you think it makes sense to go to the hospital at the next incident (which will probably be tomorrow)? (What a question..., sorry.) Maybe it doesn't make much sense to go, since he is doing OK even with the pains coming and going for a week now and the nitro keeping it (sort of) at bay. But what do I know? Have you any suggestions about what to do otherwise? I'm thinking extra magnesium, which he is doing.

Oh also, I meant to mention he is on calcium channel blockers. The package insert does not mention chest pain as a symptom. ('twould be ironic if it did, methinks :) )

None of these questions were top-of-mind when he saw the doc Friday because he was feeling great. He WILL have a chance to ask this stuff on Monday (at the next chelation). Meanwhile it's the weekend, and there's this question about going to the hospital or not. Heck this current pain could be not angina at all, but costo or something, but it is so unclear and just seems like nothing to screw around with... Thanks, as always.



Re: Chest Pain post heart-attack

Posted by Raisa on June 23, 2002 at 10:26:19:

In Reply to: Chest Pain post heart-attack posted by Jan on June 23, 2002 at 05:38:33:

Hi, Jan - While you wait for Dr. Stoll to answer I hope you won't mind my giving you my opinion about your husband.
If the nitro works to stop his chest pains, I think that means he needs it. My understanding is that when it does
nothing to stop the pain that it means the pain is not caused by angina. You should definitely IMHO call your cardiologist and tell him about these pains. I would do as Walt and others say and call the emergency number because there will be a doctor on call even if your doctor isn't.
We mustn't forget that we are paying dearly for any attention we get from these doctors!! My dad had angina for years - it could have been the atypical kind your husband thinks he has. He only had one heart attack, but we lived in a very small town, and at that time doctors made house calls! (long, long ago!) Good luck! Raisa



Re: Chest Pain post heart-attack

Posted by Jan on June 23, 2002 at 15:42:03:

In Reply to: Re: Chest Pain post heart-attack posted by Raisa on June 23, 2002 at 10:26:19:

Good point about picking up the phone, Raisa ^0)

If nitro doesn't stop the pain AT ALL it can also mean an attack is in progress (as I understand it)

So far so good.



Re: Chest Pain post heart-attack

Posted by Raisa on June 23, 2002 at 16:23:17:

In Reply to: Re: Chest Pain post heart-attack posted by Jan on June 23, 2002 at 15:42:03:

Hi -
Yes, that's the way I understand it, too, although not always, right? But I thought that the pain from angina was like a squeezing feeling in the chest. What kind of feeling did he have when he had his heart attack? I know how scary it can be. I used to worry whenever my dad had any kind of pain after he was diagnosed with angina; then we got used to it. That's why it's good to have a doctor that you have complete confidence in and one who doesn't talk down to you - one like Dr. Walt Stoll!! But there aren't many like that around anymore. Hope all goes well - at least the week end is almost over! Raisa



Re: Chest Pain post heart-attack

Posted by Jan on June 24, 2002 at 06:19:30:

In Reply to: Re: Chest Pain post heart-attack posted by Jan on June 23, 2002 at 15:42:03:

Hi Raisa

When my husband went to the doctor because of chest pain, he didn't expect to hear the diagnosis that he'd already HAD a heart attack - but that's what the EKG said. He'd just had an EKG one month earlier, and the comparison of the two EKG's showed it.

Trying to figure out when it was, he thought maybe it was one day in particular when the chest pain (squeezing pain in center of chest) was worst and sort of came to a head. But he'd had a bunch of other symptoms recently too - all of which added up to one thing "get myself to the doctor"

An article is archived here that states that ~30% of heart attacks are "silent" heart attacks - where the symptom is not chest pain but other symptoms. (archive link below)

That is good to know, and bad to know...! So every pain is scary since you don't know how to interpret it or where it's going. As you say, you "got used to" this... It must be that the person just gets to know their body and the signs and symptoms better.

Fortunately, this doc is pretty good with taking time to talk things over and responsive when someone is proactive about their health. His practice is sort of a dual conventional/alternative practice - a wise way to do things for sure - but he offers the conventional approaches first. If you want to tap into his alternative/holistic knowledge, you have to take the initiative and ask for it, otherwise you'd probably not know it was available. This is a change for him, for he used to be more up front about it... I have inklings that there is something political going on for him.

Oh, last but not least, there was no need to call today. Good. I thought it would be a good idea to call today anyway, even though he was NOT having the pains, just to clarify about typical and atypical angina and about how to interpret how different pain responds to the nitro - these are still points of confusion to clear up. No, I don't mind at all your saying what you did - I appreciate it.



My post 2u was out of sequence, it was meant to go here. oh well! nmi

Posted by Jan to Raisa on June 24, 2002 at 06:25:09:

In Reply to: Re: Chest Pain post heart-attack posted by Raisa on June 23, 2002 at 16:23:17:

nmi

Follow Ups:


Re: Chest Pain post heart-attack

Posted by Raisa on June 24, 2002 at 07:48:14:

In Reply to: Re: Chest Pain post heart-attack posted by Jan on June 24, 2002 at 06:19:30:

Hi, Jan -
I'm glad you're going to call the doctor today to see what's going on. My neighbor is a retired surgeon who has had two angioplasties (sp). He goes to the emergency room if he feels any kind of discomfort (of course, being a doctor he knows the possible symptoms and it doesn't happen often plus he is in his 80's) The last time he went was just a month ago. He felt nauseous for no reason and anxious. It turned out that he was not having a heart attack but that he was extremely nervous because his son had had an accident on his way to visit them. Your husband will learn the signs of impending trouble, and that's why it's good that you have a competent, caring doctor looking after him. Hopefully, your doctor will not become like many others - the doctor I had retired early because he was not willing to follow the politics of the new doctors. (does that make sense?). Raisa

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Re: Chest Pain post heart-attack

Posted by Walt Stoll on June 24, 2002 at 08:11:13:

In Reply to: Chest Pain post heart-attack posted by Jan on June 23, 2002 at 05:38:33:

Hi, Jan.

Having a heart attack is a very stressful situation and can easily precipitate costochondritis that would then persist and muddy up the diagnostic waters. However, the most important indication for this being angina is the fact that he has already had a documented coronary.

The fact that the nitro does not seem to get rid of it is a hopeful sign since it should help angina and would have nothing to do with costo.

I wish that he had gone right from his hospitalization to the chelating physician!

If he gets started on the Pritikin Program and does at least 2 chelations a week, he will have no more of these pains within a month IF they are angina.

Let us know how how does.

Walt

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Re: Chest Pain post heart-attack (Archive in coronary.) Silent attacks.

Posted by Walt Stoll on June 24, 2002 at 08:27:51:

In Reply to: Re: Chest Pain post heart-attack posted by Jan on June 24, 2002 at 06:19:30:

Thanks, Jan.

This clarifies how your DH learned about HIS CO.

Namaste`

Walt

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