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brown rice and diabetes

Posted by Georgia [4800.1351] on February 14, 2007 at 22:38:22:

hello..
i was having a debate w/somebody about whether there is a difference between white and brown rice on your health, in particular whether it makes a difference if you will get diabetes or not. i thought brown rice was much better for you, not only for overall health but if you were worried about getting things like diabetes. Is this correct or not?

Thanks..



Re: brown rice and diabetes

Posted by Ron [2014.1575] on February 15, 2007 at 06:41:05:

In Reply to: brown rice and diabetes posted by Georgia [4800.1351] on February 14, 2007 at 22:38:22:

Hi Georgia,

Look at the label and compare the carb content of the brown rice serving to the white rice equivalent...
If there is a huge difference in carbs and calories, then there is some good...

If there is a higher fiber content in the brown rice, that is the main reason for the difference.
You can get even more fiber and fewer carbs if you
consume Wild Rice. All grains that come with their husk will contain a higher fiber content and act
as a blood sugar modifier/delayer. Diabetics can eat such UNREFINED grains without fear, as long as there is no allergy involved.



Re: brown rice and diabetes

Posted by Walt Stoll [93.1889] on February 15, 2007 at 07:42:45:

In Reply to: brown rice and diabetes posted by Georgia [4800.1351] on February 14, 2007 at 22:38:22:

Georgia,

Listen to Ron. The calories are about the same so the short term effects on diabetes will be about the same. However all the rest of the brown rice, that is removed by the refining process that produces white rice, has a lot to do with whether a person will develop diabetes over the long run. Obviously many factors but this is one of them.

An interesting statistic is: The only reason for refining rice is to prevent spoilage. Apparently fungi, bacteria, rodents and insects are too smart to eat white rice. Anyhow, since WWII brown rice has been unavailable in China and since that time the incidence of type II diabetes has skyrocketed in China.

Walt




Re: brown rice and diabetes

Posted by ANN [1003.516] on February 15, 2007 at 18:08:38:

In Reply to: brown rice and diabetes posted by Georgia [4800.1351] on February 14, 2007 at 22:38:22:

my kids have never tasted white rice. They've been breastfed and then had whole grains, including a lot of brown rice. The first two developed diabetes at ages 7 and 12.

Read the book, The Glucose Revolution to learn about the glycemic index of foods. Whole grains are slightly better than refined in terms of blood sugar effect, but not much. The things that REAlly affect how food will affect your blood sugar as the addition of fat, protein, and acid (like mustard or oil and vinegar salad dressing).
Carbs, whole or refined, are what forced your body to produce insulin. Excess weight, which comes from eating carbs, not fat, is the major contributor to insulin resistence, which is what type 2 diabetes is all about.
So, if you are worried about diabetes, cut carbs, and those you do eat, have accompanied with protein and fat.
Brown rice is better for your health in terms of keeping your colon running smoothly, which allows your body to detox and stay healthy. Instead of looking at only one disease, it's a good idea to look at the overall health picture.



Re: brown rice and diabetes

Posted by R. [1213.3210] on February 15, 2007 at 19:24:00:

In Reply to: brown rice and diabetes posted by Georgia [4800.1351] on February 14, 2007 at 22:38:22:

If whole grains (as well as seeds and nuts) aren't prepared properly to neutralize antinutrients present in them, one could develop nutritional deficiencies. See



Re: brown rice and diabetes

Posted by Georgia [4800.1351] on February 16, 2007 at 07:37:04:

In Reply to: Re: brown rice and diabetes posted by R. [1213.3210] on February 15, 2007 at 19:24:00:

Interesting article.. thanks!!! I didn't know this about grains/nuts.

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Re: brown rice and diabetes

Posted by Georgia [4800.1351] on February 16, 2007 at 07:40:13:

In Reply to: Re: brown rice and diabetes posted by ANN [1003.516] on February 15, 2007 at 18:08:38:

Thanks for the post... are you the one who used to follow the macrobiotic diet? Do you think it was the brown rice that caused your children's diabetes? I know that w/macrobiotics they won't discourage you from eating just a bowl of brown rice, without anything else. I've done this before, now I know not to ever do this. But generally we do eat it w/protein.

I heard of the overweight/diabetes connection but I know of a LOT of people who are not overweight at all who have it, or are pre-diabetic. So, I didn't think the correlation was so strong. I'm still young and am not overweight, but with a family history of diabetes, I do worry. I had a cbc earlier this week that showed nothing to worry about, for now.
GA



Re: brown rice and diabetes

Posted by Georgia [4800.1351] on February 16, 2007 at 07:41:47:

In Reply to: Re: brown rice and diabetes posted by Walt Stoll [93.1889] on February 15, 2007 at 07:42:45:

Is brown rice more likely to spoil then? I always thought it would last almost forever.

You confirm my observation that a lot of asians have diabetes... it's unusual for you to get older as an asian and NOT have diabetes. I always thought it was their consumption of rice, for practically every meal, and mostly white rice at that.



Re: brown rice and diabetes

Posted by Georgia [4800.1351] on February 16, 2007 at 07:42:48:

In Reply to: Re: brown rice and diabetes posted by Ron [2014.1575] on February 15, 2007 at 06:41:05:

Thanks for the wild rice tip. I didn't know there was a difference between plain brown rice, and wild brown rice.

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Re: brown rice and diabetes

Posted by Walt Stoll [93.1889] on February 16, 2007 at 10:22:07:

In Reply to: Re: brown rice and diabetes posted by Georgia [4800.1351] on February 16, 2007 at 07:41:47:

Georgia,

White rice IS refined brown rice. White rice almost never spoils BECAUSE all the nutrients except most of the calories, have been removed. Brown rice will always spoil because the trace nutrients attract the attention of every fungus, bacteria and varmint looking for something nutritious to eat. Only humans are stupid enough to eat white rice.

Walt

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Re: brown rice and diabetes

Posted by ANN [1003.516] on February 17, 2007 at 20:06:26:

In Reply to: Re: brown rice and diabetes posted by Georgia [4800.1351] on February 16, 2007 at 07:40:13:

no, I don't think brown rice caused my kids' diabetes. Yes, I followed a macrobiotic diet for 6 years, but switched to whole grain vegan when I married, 11 months before having my first kid.
I suspect the first kid's diabetes, type 1 (he's very skinny and always has been) is due to his gluten intolerance-that it was the whole wheat, oats, barley, and barley malt that led his to be nutritionally compromised despite a good appetite and a healthy variety of foods. I don't know what led to the second kid's diabetes, but my small town has a proportionately large cluster of cases, which suggests environmental causes.



Re: brown rice and diabetes

Posted by Walt Stoll [93.1889] on February 18, 2007 at 07:19:57:

In Reply to: Re: brown rice and diabetes posted by ANN [1003.516] on February 17, 2007 at 20:06:26:

Thanks, Ann.

Remember that the only dietary connection currently proven by conventional medicine, for type I diabetes is dairy.

Walt



Re: brown rice and diabetes

Posted by Georgia [4800.1351] on February 18, 2007 at 07:53:11:

In Reply to: Re: brown rice and diabetes posted by Walt Stoll [93.1889] on February 18, 2007 at 07:19:57:

Wait.. dairy causes diabetes?



Re: brown rice and diabetes

Posted by ANN [1003.516] on February 18, 2007 at 08:13:31:

In Reply to: Re: brown rice and diabetes posted by Georgia [4800.1351] on February 18, 2007 at 07:53:11:

NO, it doesn't. Dairy can be bad for you for a variety of reasons, but it isn't particularly implicated in diabetes (BTW, my kids have never tasted dairy).
There has been a study to SEE if there was a connection between type 1 diabetes and dairy, so an there is an article in a medical journal about it (your library can get you photocopies of medical journal articles upon request, but you have to get the exact name and date of journal and page #'s to request it-you can probably find the abstract on google and then request the article.
It was a reasonable thing to research-type 1 diabetes (the one that usually starts in childhood and usually affects skinny kids (it is estimated that perhaps 5% of people with diabetes have type 1), is a prodominantly WHITE disease. This led researchers to wonder why . So they looked for what white people have in coomon.One thing is that about half of white people can actually drink milk (most people of color and the other half of white people are lactose intolerant, though often don't know it, so drink milk anyway). SO, researchers figured maybe the mutation that created the white race and the mutation that allowed for milk drinking were related to type 1 diabetes. They studied some people with type 1 diabetes and YES, some of them have antibodies to something in milk. Not all of them, and they didn't control the experiment by looking for those same antibodies in people of color who DON'T have type 1 diabetes.

I find more interesting the idea that type 1 diabetes may sometimes be caused by the pertussis or MMR vaccines. There is a sensible article on that at www.909shot.com
but, no, my kids never had vaccines either.
there is obviously more than one cause.

but does any or this matter to you? The diabetes that is rampant among adults in this country and that has affected the Chinese all these years is type 2 diabetes which has no articles about dairy influence that I know of. People of all races get type 2 diabetes and overweight is a factor in about 90% of cases.


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Re: brown rice and diabetes

Posted by ANN [1003.516] on February 18, 2007 at 08:16:23:

In Reply to: Re: brown rice and diabetes posted by Walt Stoll [93.1889] on February 18, 2007 at 07:19:57:

that's not proven. There has been one article published on that notion, which was inspired by type 1 being a Caucasian disease and researchers trying to figure out why. Only some of people with type 1 diabetes have antibodies to milk. My kids have never consumed dairy and I personally gave dairy up 7 years before giving birth.



Re: brown rice and diabetes

Posted by Sally [7059.1590] on February 18, 2007 at 08:47:28:

In Reply to: Re: brown rice and diabetes posted by ANN [1003.516] on February 17, 2007 at 20:06:26:

How often are there two Type 1's in the same family? So genetics may be the largest factor? I only knew one family that had type 1 and that was among five children.



Re: brown rice and diabetes

Posted by Walt Stoll [93.1889] on February 18, 2007 at 16:48:54:

In Reply to: Re: brown rice and diabetes posted by Georgia [4800.1351] on February 18, 2007 at 07:53:11:

Georgia,

Type I only. Look up the research on the internet. I have archived some of the studies in the archives at least a couple of years ago.

Walt

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Re: brown rice and diabetes

Posted by Walt Stoll [93.1889] on February 18, 2007 at 16:53:32:

In Reply to: Re: brown rice and diabetes posted by ANN [1003.516] on February 18, 2007 at 08:16:23:

Ann,

Surely it is only one factor and then only in genetically susceptible children.

Walt



Re: brown rice and diabetes

Posted by ANN [1003.516] on February 19, 2007 at 06:59:25:

In Reply to: Re: brown rice and diabetes posted by Sally [7059.1590] on February 18, 2007 at 08:47:28:

very rare-type 1 usually occurs in families with no history of type 1 diabetes. My family also has had no type 2 diabetes (the kids' grandparents lived to 70,73,74, and 90 with no diabetes)

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Re: brown rice and diabetes

Posted by ANN [1003.516] on February 19, 2007 at 08:09:54:

In Reply to: Re: brown rice and diabetes posted by Walt Stoll [93.1889] on February 18, 2007 at 16:53:32:

I have a real question in my mind about putting things onto genetics. Some doctor practicing in Hawaii early in his career, perhap McDougall, spoke of treating the aging parents of his patients and how they just didn't have the problems of their 30 and 40 year old children. He saw it primarily coming down to diet.
When I read all the anti-vaccine books 17 years ago, parents would suddenly see a dramatic change in their normally developing baby after a vaccination and would be told by the doctor that the child had a 'latent; condition that would've eventually cropped up anyway. Of course, the doctors didn't report these things as vaccine reactions, greatly skewing the stats for vaccine injuries. I've seen convincing arguments for the effects of the pertussis and MMR vaccines for being aa cause of type 1 diabetes.
Of course, genetics is also genetic damage that may have been done to we baby boomers when we got the first generation vaccines. Since I haven't vaccinated my own kids, I'm concerned with the second generation effect that vaccines might have. But second generation effect of ANYTHING seems to be study in its infancy. I've recently seen a study on increased incidence of asthma in children whose maternal grandmothers were heavy smokers. I think second generation effect is worth studying, but I also worry about it, in this smoking study, serving as a smoke screen for the often reported effect of current vaccines in influencing asthma development-is this kind of study trying to draw us away from a real cause (only person in my family with asthma is a heavily vaccinated niece, and, yes, her maternal grandmother was a heavy smoker, but none of her siblings or cousins have asthma (her siblings were much older than her and homeschooled, so not vaccinated, but she went to normal schools and got all the vaccines). Her cousins aren't vaccinated.

I don't know the answers, I just fear the current buzzword of genetics will create a sense of fatalism, reduce peoples' attempts at helping themselves healthwise, and obscure other possible causes of diseases.



Re: brown rice and diabetes How it works. Archive.

Posted by Walt Stoll [93.1889] on February 19, 2007 at 16:41:09:

In Reply to: Re: brown rice and diabetes posted by ANN [1003.516] on February 19, 2007 at 08:09:54:

Ann,

As I have said many times on this BB: current genetic research indicates that about 20% of conditions are mainly due to genes and the other 80% are mainly due to what we decide to DO with what we have inherited. Since we still cannot change our genes, we are reduced to the 80% we CAN do something about.

That is why I have spent all of my time sharing what I have learned about that.

Walt

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