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Gout

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Gout

Posted by
Joe Updegrove on January 19, 2001 at 21:46:51:

I have recently been diagnosed with "gout" and have logged on in order to help my cause. After several episodes, prior to being diagnosed, I suffered a bout that put me down for a day. After which I went to my doctor and through a blood test he diagnosed me with "gout" and place me on allipurinol. My research tells me that it may take 2 to 3 months for the medication to fully take effect. However, after on month and since my most severe attack in mid December I have had two other mild bouts. I am not a consistent heavy drinker but I have been know to drink my fair share of beer one night on the weekends. I have reduced this intake and have not had been, but have had mixed drinks....thinking that the beer consumption did not help my suffering. My diet has not really changed with the past 8 years. I avoid organ meats, don't drink wine, and recently have cut back on the consumption of red meats.
I'm sure your research show has shown you how those of us with the diagnosis feel when one day we limp into work and the next day or two later we are fine. I am searching for any help anyone can offer. I have jokingly suggested that I will become a vegetarian if that is what it take. Can you help or offer any other advice.
I am interested in finding if people are having positive experiences with low
purine diet and gout management. Also, if anyone has an extensive list of
foods to avoid for gout I would be greatly appreciative. I would also like to know it really means to be on a "low purine diet".
Patiently awaiting your replay,
Joe Updegrove
jupdegrove@sacs.k12.in.us



Re: Gout

Posted by Terri-Lynn on January 21, 2001 at 03:36:56:

In Reply to: Gout posted by Joe Updegrove on January 19, 2001 at 21:46:51:

I am not a doctor but an ecological kinesiologist;
Intuitively i feel that the alcohol is more of a problem then you might think, getting off all would be a very supportive thing. Look into P.H. blance; Your on the right track though;

Here is some other info i found for you;
DIET AND ARTHRITIS

Today many doctors tell arthritis patients that diet has nothing to do with their disease. However, an accumulating number of studies have found that dietary restriction can significantly reduce arthritis pain in up to 75% of patients. Several studies have found that nightshades (potatoes, eggplant, tomatoes and cayenne pepper) can cause or exacerbate arthritis in some patients. Another found that one third of arthritis patients report food-triggered flare-ups. While Gout is the only form of arthritis directly caused by dietary excess, in some individuals arthritis can be caused or exacerbated by an allergic reaction to a particular food. A number of researchers now refer to these cases as "allergic arthritis". In cases of allergic arthritis blood tests do not show the usual indications of the disease.

Consumption of hydrogenated fats and polyunsaturated vegetable oils have been shown to promote arthritic inflammation. Low protein diets have been shown to reduce pain in rheumatoid arthritis patients while high protein diets have been shown to irritate the immune system and trigger flare-ups.

The three particular classes of foods that are most often implicated in causing or inflaming arthritis are:

1. Dairy products
2. Nightshades (potato, tomato, egg-plant and all pepper other than common black pepper)
3. Shrimp and shellfish

There's also evidence that reducing fat intake can significantly reduce arthritis pain and inflammation. Several articles have appeared in popular magazines advocating the elimination of red meats from the diet as a treatment for arthritis. Some rheumatoid arthritis sufferers have experienced a complete remission of their disease after adopting strict vegetarian diets (including little or no vegetable oil). Symptoms promptly reappeared after a return to a fatty diet. You should also note that dietary fiber helps speed the removal of fat from the body and reduces it's absorption into the bloodstream.

The bottom line on dietary restriction seems to be that it may prove helpful for some sensitive individuals but may never be an effective approach for most arthritis sufferers. One thing is for sure, temporarily removing a suspected food from your diet is a low-risk, low-cost strategy that's worth a try as it just might work for you.


THE NUTRITIONAL APPROACH

First, anyone who suffers from arthritis should take a good, high-quality multi-vitamin tablet each day. Consider it cheap insurance against nutrient deficiencies that can cause or aggravate arthritis. Chances are that taking a multi-vitamin won't cure you or provide any noticeable relief but it can:





Re: Gout (Archive in arthritis.)

Posted by Walt Stoll on January 21, 2001 at 09:33:52:

In Reply to: Gout posted by Joe Updegrove on January 19, 2001 at 21:46:51:

Hi, Joe.

Listen to Terri-Lynn (Thanks, Terri-Lynn!)

From a conventional standpoint, goute is a congenital problem that shows up sooner or later in life depending on the penetrance of the missing gene.

See the postings about goute in the arthritis archives.

When we metabolize protein, the breakdown products are uric acid to urea. The uric acid is NOT very soluble in water and the urea is perfectly soluble. The reason urine is called urine is because of all the urea excreted that way.

HOWEVER, if you are missing the gene that makes the enzyme that converts uric acid to urea, the crystals of the insoluble uric acid tend to accumulate inside the joints, in the kidneys and even in the skin. THIS is what is known as goute.

About 50 years ago it was accidently discovered that allopurinal (Zyloprim) mimics, exactly, that missing enzyme without significant side effects. That means that anyone with a bonifide diagnosis of goute can be normal by just taking a 300 milligram tablet once a day.

Unfortunately about 90% of people who have been diagnosed as goute do not have it at all.

The only true diagnosis is made by comparing a blood test with a 24 hours urine for uric acid. Most docs are lazy and only do the blood test and thereby falsely diagnose the problem.

You would have to take the allopurinal for the rest of your life. What Terri-Lynn is suggesting might allow you to get off of it, depending on your penetrance.

You first have to be certain that you actually HAVE goute.

Hope this helps.

Walt




Re: Gout

Posted by Dave on January 21, 2001 at 19:27:02:

In Reply to: Re: Gout posted by Terri-Lynn on January 21, 2001 at 03:36:56:

Terri-lynn, Have you ever heard of eating fresh cherries for gout. I have three friends who have gout and had to take allopurinal for it. I had read somewhere where eating about a dozen of fresh cherries a day would take the gout away from about 60% of the people. Well they laughted at me and did just that and two out of the three did not have to take there medicine anymore, until they could not get the fresh cherries anymore and the gout returned. Now when cherries are in season they eat cherries and when they are out of season they take there medication. Does anyone know what would be in a cherry that would take care of gout in some people. I am just curious if anyone has heard of this before. Thanks



Re: Gout

Posted by sezbearz on January 22, 2001 at 03:49:12:

In Reply to: Re: Gout posted by Dave on January 21, 2001 at 19:27:02:

could some one please explain in plain English to me what is and how to find Gout?
My son of 14 years was diagonosed today with this in his toe/foot?
Iam unsure of what to think!
Signed help me please!!!



Re: Gout

Posted by Terri-Lynn on January 22, 2001 at 04:18:37:

In Reply to: Re: Gout posted by Dave on January 21, 2001 at 19:27:02:

Well all i know about cherries so far is that they are very very alkaline and have a lot of minerals in them [ Bernard Jensen always talked up Black cherry juice]; Any time you can Alkalize the body it is a plus, but if you one minuet you do something alkaline and then do a lot of acid forming foods and drinks, then it would amaze me if the juice would have much of a lasting effect with someone; Let us know, if someone trys it; I sitll believe in life style changes, but always looking for fast fixes that work like anyone else, to push things to the edge [as not to get off some things we are addicted to] ha!



Re: Gout

Posted by Terri-Lynn on January 22, 2001 at 04:25:09:

In Reply to: Re: Gout posted by sezbearz on January 22, 2001 at 03:49:12:

Start now on a good alkaline food plan and some good body work would be a plus. The key is do not get caught up in the word to much, but get in to any solutions and many are offered both in the archives and in many great books and on this board; Listen to Walt, even if it is close to Gout you can start life style changes now; A good alkaline body is a healthy body!



Re: Gout

Posted by Walt Stoll on January 24, 2001 at 08:59:54:

In Reply to: Re: Gout posted by sezbearz on January 22, 2001 at 03:49:12:

Hi, sezbearz.

Listen to Terri-Lynn (Thanks Terri-Lynn!)

Also, take the time to read the many goute responses I have made the past month about exactly this subject.

THEN, if you still have questions, write again.

Walt



Re: Gout

Posted by Wildernes Sue on January 28, 2001 at 02:44:27:

In Reply to: Gout posted by Joe Updegrove on January 19, 2001 at 21:46:51:

A"low purine diet" means that you should stay away from foods that are high in the amino acid purine.Some of which are anchovies,sardines,organ meats,some fish.Gout is associated with rich diets,high in sugar,white flour,simple carbohydrates,wine,liquor etc.Too much uric acid is produced by the body from the purines,so it accumulates in the blood and body tissues till it makes into small crystals.These crystals are sharp-edged needle-like and tend to get into the joints.
There are four things that will help:
1.Easiest first-drink lots more water to help dilute the acid buildup.
2.Next easiest-eat more cherries,drink more cherry juice(natural 100% cherry juice,without added sugar,corn syrups or other sweeteners).I have bought wonderful cherries in the summer and froze them for winter use.They can also be dehydrated and stored in a jar.My kids loved them in fruit leathers(dehydrated fruit puree).Also celery seed helps.You can get it in the spice section of the grocery store.Mix some into your potato salad,or soups.Compounds in these two items keep the uric acid from crystallizing.
3.This takes some effort-get some good vitamins and take them regularly.Vitamins do help in the long haul.It also makes you more aware of your eating habits,when you study up about vitamins and disease,so get some books too.
4.This one is hard-get off sugar and alcohol.It takes a long time for this step.I dont recommend cold turkey.Keep cutting back 1/4 to 1/2 drinks whether its soda or booze.Both sugar(including white flour products)and alcohol cause an incrase in uric acid production.



Re: Gout

Posted by Wildernes Sue on January 28, 2001 at 02:45:49:

In Reply to: Gout posted by Joe Updegrove on January 19, 2001 at 21:46:51:

A"low purine diet" means that you should stay away from foods that are high in the amino acid purine.Some of which are anchovies,sardines,organ meats,some fish.Gout is associated with rich diets,high in sugar,white flour,simple carbohydrates,wine,liquor etc.Too much uric acid is produced by the body from the purines,so it accumulates in the blood and body tissues till it makes into small crystals.These crystals are sharp-edged needle-like and tend to get into the joints.
There are four things that will help:
1.Easiest first-drink lots more water to help dilute the acid buildup.
2.Next easiest-eat more cherries,drink more cherry juice(natural 100% cherry juice,without added sugar,corn syrups or other sweeteners).I have bought wonderful cherries in the summer and froze them for winter use.They can also be dehydrated and stored in a jar.My kids loved them in fruit leathers(dehydrated fruit puree).Also celery seed helps.You can get it in the spice section of the grocery store.Mix some into your potato salad,or soups.Compounds in these two items keep the uric acid from crystallizing.
3.This takes some effort-get some good vitamins and take them regularly.Vitamins do help in the long haul.It also makes you more aware of your eating habits,when you study up about vitamins and disease,so get some books too.
4.This one is hard-get off sugar and alcohol.It takes a long time for this step.I dont recommend cold turkey.Keep cutting back 1/4 to 1/2 drinks whether its soda or booze.Both sugar(including white flour products)and alcohol cause an incrase in uric acid production.



Re: Gout

Posted by Sue on January 28, 2001 at 18:07:55:

In Reply to: Re: Gout posted by Dave on January 21, 2001 at 19:27:02:

My 85 year old Mom has just been diagnosed with gout. I am trying to learn as much about it as I can so I might be able to help her. As soon as she told me about her gout it reminded me of something I thought I should check out...so, I have a guestion...While in Australia this past June I found myself having a very pleasent conversation with an older Aussie Gent. During this long conversation it came out, that, just over a year ago he had been diagnosed with gout. After suffering for some time a friend from the States advised him to try some glucosamine and condroiten. He did, and the gout went away, or so he said. Is this possable or just a figment of his imagination or a misdiagnosis to start with? How wonderful it would be if it is true, but from all I have read...I don't think so... Any thoughts?
This site has been most helpful...Thanks All!



Re: Gout

Posted by Dave on January 29, 2001 at 01:08:31:

In Reply to: Re: Gout posted by Sue on January 28, 2001 at 18:07:55:

Sue, I really do not know. But it will not hurt anything.



Re: Gout

Posted by Sue on January 29, 2001 at 09:43:20:

In Reply to: Re: Gout posted by Dave on January 29, 2001 at 01:08:31:

Hi Dave. That's my thinking also. I think the Allopurinal/Zyloprim sounds hopeful also. But as long as the G&C would not hurt, it's worth a shot.



Re: Gout

Posted by Walt Stoll on January 30, 2001 at 09:17:59:

In Reply to: Re: Gout posted by Sue on January 28, 2001 at 18:07:55:

Hi, Sue.

Since 90% of all goute diagnoses are erroneous, I would need to know how the diagnosis was made before commenting.

See the archives about goute.

Walt



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