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Poor Helpless Kids (Archive in monopoly.)

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Poor Helpless Kids (Archive in monopoly.)

Posted by Walt Stoll on January 07, 2003 at 11:48:07:

FDA Approves Prozac for Children, Teens


NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The US Food and Drug Administration
(news
- web sites) said on Friday that it has approved Eli Lilly & Co.'s
Prozac (fluoxetine) to treat depression and obsessive compulsive
disorder (OCD) in children and adolescents aged seven to 17 years.

According to the FDA, Prozac is the first selective serotonin
reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) to receive approval for treating
depression in children. The approval was based on two studies of
children and adolescents with depression, which showed that the drug
produced a statistically significant effect compared with placebo.
The drug also produced a statistically significant effect compared
with placebo in studies of children and adolescents with OCD.


Side effects associated with Prozac use among children and
adolescents were similar to those observed in adults and included
nausea, tiredness, nervousness, dizziness and difficulty
concentrating.


The FDA noted that in one of the clinical studies, after 19 weeks
of treatment with Prozac, children gained, on average, about 1.1 cm
less in height (about a half an inch) and about one kilogram less in
weight (about two pounds) compared with children treated with a
placebo. According to the agency, "the clinical significance of this
observation on long-term growth is unknown."


Lilly will conduct a phase IV post-marketing study to further
evaluate the potential impact of Prozac on long-term growth in
children.


Citing figures from the National Institute of Mental Health, the
FDA said depression affects up to 2.5% of children and 8.3% of
adolescents in the US. OCD affects roughly 2% of the population and
typically begins during adolescence or childhood.


Indianapolis-based Lilly lost patent protection on Prozac in
August 2001. The drug was once a blockbuster, pulling in sales of
$2.5 billion in 2000. Since losing patent protection, several
generic formulations of Prozac have flooded the US market, cutting
sharply into Lilly's revenues.

------------------------------------------------------------------
How is it, that this stuff can hit the markets after only 19 weeks
of clinical study? Without even knowing the long term affects?

comments anyone?
Misty
http://www.searching-alternatives.com





Re: Poor Helpless Kids (Archive in monopoly.)

Posted by ~CT on January 07, 2003 at 12:28:55:

In Reply to: Poor Helpless Kids (Archive in monopoly.) posted by Walt Stoll on January 07, 2003 at 11:48:07:

"Side effects...included nausea, tiredness, nervousness, dizziness and difficulty concentrating."

And this is an improvement??



Re: Poor Helpless Kids (Archive in monopoly.)

Posted by Joanie on January 07, 2003 at 13:00:20:

In Reply to: Poor Helpless Kids (Archive in monopoly.) posted by Walt Stoll on January 07, 2003 at 11:48:07:

Prozac nearly killed me. I can't imagine what kind of people would do this to children. Do they really believe that it's harmless, or are they just cold hearted? I wonder if they would give it to their own kids...

Namaste`

Joanie



Re: Poor Helpless Kids (Archive in monopoly.)

Posted by PhillyLady on January 07, 2003 at 13:29:10:

In Reply to: Poor Helpless Kids (Archive in monopoly.) posted by Walt Stoll on January 07, 2003 at 11:48:07:

Hi Doc:

Wasn't the woman who killed her five children a year ago taking Prozac? I seem to recall that the drug she took made her finally become out of touch with reality.

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Re: Poor Helpless Kids (Archive in monopoly.)

Posted by Jan S. on January 07, 2003 at 14:27:34:

In Reply to: Poor Helpless Kids (Archive in monopoly.) posted by Walt Stoll on January 07, 2003 at 11:48:07:

Oh wow. So glad I am grown up now, given the kind of kid I was, I prolly would have been Prozac'ed into submission. I grew up in a psychiatric family who were true believers in shrinkery for the kids (but not for themselves, heh). At least we were not drugged. Gone are the days when kids had "just growing pains" I guess.

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Re: Poor Helpless Kids (Archive in monopoly.)

Posted by
zarin on January 07, 2003 at 17:43:31:

In Reply to: Poor Helpless Kids (Archive in monopoly.) posted by Walt Stoll on January 07, 2003 at 11:48:07:

Is nothing sacred in America anymore? It would seem that the real villans are the legalised Drug Lords of America who lobby in Washington to push drugs and create victims who are legalised addicts. Why is it that the public is complacent enough to accept a pill for every problem they may encounter? No allopathic drug can heal, it can only supress symptoms. At times, I agree, it is necessary to supress symptoms and give the body time to heal itself. However, in the end, it is the human body that will heal itself. It is tragic to see a nation of people trapped in a system that is ruled by the greed of large corporations.



Re: Poor Helpless Kids (Archive in monopoly.)

Posted by R. on January 07, 2003 at 18:01:09:

In Reply to: Re: Poor Helpless Kids (Archive in monopoly.) posted by Joanie on January 07, 2003 at 13:00:20:

Parents give it to their children because they believe the benefits outweigh the negative side effect risks. My sister gave it to his son on recommendation of his doctor (school officials demanded that). They wanted to go an HMO route because it's cheaper.

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Re: Poor Helpless Kids (Archive in monopoly.)

Posted by R. on January 07, 2003 at 18:14:15:

In Reply to: Re: Poor Helpless Kids (Archive in monopoly.) posted by zarin on January 07, 2003 at 17:43:31:

Most people are dumb; hence, the term "masses". They don't know what heals and what suppresses. Most family are focused on having their ends meet. And when a dumbie (and/or poor one) is told his/her child needs to be medicated or be expelled from school, a natural reaction is to avoid what brings pain. So, they go to a doctor and get medication.

I think violence would be appropriate in this situation. A school official who demands giving medication to a child needs to be "taken care of". But to do that safely, one needs to have some funds available, which most families don't have. And there's also fear of committing violence. They would rather have it done to their own children through God-like doctors.

Alternatively (to violence), one could remove allergenic foods, artificial dyes from the child's diet, replace junk food with whole foods, and the problems would go away in most cases. But something has still to be done to the school officials.

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Psychiatrist's resignation from American Psychiatric Assoc.

Posted by Mary on January 07, 2003 at 23:11:41:

In Reply to: Poor Helpless Kids (Archive in monopoly.) posted by Walt Stoll on January 07, 2003 at 11:48:07:

Harvard Trained Psychiatrist Perspective on Drug Based Psychiatry

Dr. Loren Mosher is a board-certified psychiatrist who received his BA from Stanford University and M.D. from Harvard Medical School in 1961, where he also subsequently took his psychiatric training.

Mosher, who has written numerous articles and reviews and has edited and written books, has his own consulting company, Soteria Associates, and is currently a clinical professor of psychiatry at the School of Medicine, University of California at San Diego.
What follows is a letter Mosher wrote on December 4, 1998 to Dr.Rodrigo Munoz,
then President of the American Psychiatric Association.

Rodrigo Munoz, MD, President
American Psychiatric Association
1400 "K" Street N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20005

Dear Rod:

After nearly three decades as a member it is with a mixture of pleasure and disappointment that I submit this letter of resignation from the American Psychiatric Association. The major reason for this action is my belief that I am actually resigning from the American Psychopharmacological Association.

Luckily, the organization's true identity requires no change in the acronym.

Unfortunately, APA reflects, and reinforces, in word and deed, our drug dependent society. Yet it helps wage war on "drugs". " Dual diagnosis" clients are a major problem for the field but not because of the "good" drugs we prescribe. "Bad" ones are those that are obtained mostly without a prescription.

A Marxist would observe that being a good capitalist organization, APA likes only those drugs from which it can derive a profit-directly or indirectly. This is not a group for me. At this point in history, in my view, psychiatry has been almost completely bought out by the drug companies.

The APA could not continue without the pharmaceutical company support of meetings, symposia, workshops, journal advertising, grand rounds luncheons, unrestricted educational grants etc. etc. Psychiatrists have become the minions of drug company promotions.

APA, of course, maintains that its independence and autonomy are not compromised in this enmeshed situation. Anyone with the least bit of common sense attending the annual meeting would observe how the drug company exhibits and "industry sponsored symposia" draw crowds with their various enticements while the serious scientific sessions are barely attended.

Psychiatric training reflects their influence as well; i.e., the most important part of a resident's curriculum is the art and quasi-science of dealing drugs, i.e., prescription writing.

These psychopharmacological limitations on our abilities to be complete physicians also limit our intellectual horizons. No longer do we seek to understand whole persons in their social contexts-rather we are there to realign our patients' neurotransmitters. The problem is that it is very difficult to have a relationship with a neurotransmitter-whatever its
configuration.

So, our guild organization provides a rationale, by its neurobiological tunnel vision, for keeping our distance from the molecule conglomerates we have come to define as patients. We condone and promote the widespread overuse and misuse of toxic chemicals that we know have serious long term effects -- tardive dyskinesia, tardive dementia and
serious withdrawal syndromes.

So, do I want to be a drug company patsy who treats molecules with their formulary? No, thank you very much. It saddens me that after 35 years as a psychiatrist I look forward to being dissociated from such an organization. In no way does it represent my interests. It is not within my
capacities to buy into the current biomedical-reductionistic model heralded by the psychiatric leadership as once again marrying us to somatic medicine. This is a matter of fashion, politics and, like the pharmaceutical house connection, money.

"Biologically based brain diseases" are certainly convenient for families and practitioners alike. It is no fault insurance against personal responsibility. We are all just helplessly caught up in a swirl of brain pathology for which no one, except DNA, is responsible.

Now, to begin with, anything that has an anatomically defined specific brain pathology becomes the province of neurology (syphilis is an excellent example). So, to be consistent with this "brain disease" view all the major psychiatric disorders would become the territory of our
neurologic colleagues.

Without having surveyed them I believe they would eschew responsibility for these problematic individuals. However, consistency would demand our giving over "biologic brain diseases" to them. The fact that there is no evidence confirming the brain disease attribution is, at this point,
totally disregarded. What we are dealing with here is fashion, politics and money.

This level of intellectual /scientific dishonesty is just too egregious for me to continue to support by my membership.

I view with no surprise that psychiatric training is being systematically disavowed by American medical school graduates. This must give us cause for concern about the state of today's psychiatry. It must mean - at least in part - that they view psychiatry as being very limited and
unchallenging.

To me it seems clear that we are headed toward a situation in which, except for academics, most psychiatric practitioners will have no real relationships -- so vital to the healing process -- with the disturbed and disturbing persons they treat. Their sole role will be that of prescription writers - ciphers in the guise of being "helpers".

Finally, why must the APA pretend to know more than it does? DSM IV is the fabrication upon which psychiatry seeks acceptance by medicine in general. Insiders know it is more a political than scientific document. To its credit it says so-although its brief apologia is rarely noted.

DSM IV has become a bible and a money making best seller-its major failings notwithstanding. It confines and defines practice, some take it seriously, others more realistically. It is the way to get paid. Diagnostic reliability is easy to attain for research projects. The issue is what do the
categories tell us?

Do they in fact accurately represent the person with a problem? They don't, and can't, because there are no external validating criteria for psychiatric diagnoses. There is neither a blood test nor specific anatomic lesions for any major psychiatric disorder. So, where are we? APA as an organization has implicitly (sometimes explicitly as well) bought into a theoretical hoax. Is psychiatry a hoax-as practiced today?

Unfortunately, the answer is mostly yes.

We seem to have forgotten a basic principle - the need to be
patient/client/consumer satisfaction oriented. I always remember Manfred Bleuler's wisdom: "Loren, you must never forget that you are your patient's employee." In the end they will determine whether or not psychiatry survives in the service marketplace.

Sincerely,

Loren R. Mosher M.D

Redflagsweekly.com


DR. MERCOLA'S COMMENT:
Dr. Moser's comments are generally accurate for every medical specialty. However, they particularly ring true for psychiatry.

Most of you know that I believe unresolved emotional wounding is one of the most significant factors contributing to disease.

Psychiatry is the branch of medicine that is best suited to address this wounding.

Unfortunately, as Dr. Moser's letter indicates, psychiatry has long ago elected to follow a drug based paradigm in their resolution of this wounding.

Most anyone reading this newsletter is well aware of the futility and ineffectiveness of this approach for the long-term improvement of the patient. However, it does benefit the drug companies quite nicely.

Fortunately there are better options. EFT is one of them. Of all the medical doctors who know EFT, by far the largest specialty contingent would be psychiatry. Progressive psychiatrists seeking the truth instantly recognized the beauty, effectiveness and simplicity of this technique.



Re: Poor Helpless Kids (Archive in monopoly.)

Posted by Walt Stoll on January 08, 2003 at 08:37:17:

In Reply to: Re: Poor Helpless Kids (Archive in monopoly.) posted by ~CT on January 07, 2003 at 12:28:55:

Thanks, ~CT.

It is an improvement in the drug company's bottom line :o).

Walt

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Psychiatrist's resignation from American Psychiatric Assoc. Archive in brain che

Posted by Walt Stoll on January 08, 2003 at 09:44:05:

In Reply to: Psychiatrist's resignation from American Psychiatric Assoc. posted by Mary on January 07, 2003 at 23:11:41:

Thanks, Mary.

Obviously Dr Mosher is a psychiatrist with integrity and commitment! I am glad to see that the situation is finally too much for the honest members of the APA.

Namaste`

Walt

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Re: Poor Helpless Kids (Archive in monopoly.)

Posted by
zarin on January 08, 2003 at 17:32:44:

In Reply to: Poor Helpless Kids (Archive in monopoly.) posted by Walt Stoll on January 07, 2003 at 11:48:07:

I currently have a friend from Florida visiting with me. She works with displaced kids in America. Yesterday, I mentioned to her about FDA approving the usage of Prozac in younger kids. She did not bat an eyelid! Apparently it has already been in use and is extensively used to control violent behaviour in kids in shelters. Her contention is that it is better to use Prozac and have a manageable kid than to have a violent kid.

I am unable to comment on this as I have not been exposed to kids with behavioural problems. I am however never in favour of any form of chemical dependency and am appalled that anyone would enforce such a plight on an helpless kid.

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Re: Poor Helpless Kids (Archive in monopoly.)

Posted by EllieK on January 09, 2003 at 09:55:12:

In Reply to: Poor Helpless Kids (Archive in monopoly.) posted by Walt Stoll on January 07, 2003 at 11:48:07:

I may get hammered for saying this, but there are probably instances in which it is appropriate for kids to get an antidepressant while they, their families, and a psychologist or social worker help them to deal with their problems in other ways. Other ways like nutrition, SR, and behavioral techniques to help the child cope with his/her inborn neurology.
I have a kid with an inborn, intense temperament, but no, he is not on an SSRI. He's 6. When he was 4, we taught him to meditate, we do our best to control his diet (not easy when they're out and about), and exercise is a part of his every day. Right now he's coping, and we think he always will, but if it came to a point where he was paralyzed by anxiety and nothing else worked, we would stabilize him on an SSRI for a short time while we explored the other options.
My sense is that SSRI's might be appropriate for 1% of kids, and for a very short time to stabilize a crisis, and not for the 15% implied by the press release.



Re: Poor Helpless Kids (Archive in monopoly.)

Posted by Walt Stoll on January 10, 2003 at 07:45:03:

In Reply to: Re: Poor Helpless Kids (Archive in monopoly.) posted by EllieK on January 09, 2003 at 09:55:12:

Right on, Ellie K.!

I have always said that we need both conventional and all the other, presently disenfranchized healing modalities, for a whole health care policy.

It is the AMA that is insisting that their way is the only way and everyone else is a quack. That is why 15% of kids are getting drugged when less than 1% might need them.

Namaste`

Walt

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