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Rebounding on an exercise ball

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Rebounding on an exercise ball

Posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 02:15:55:

I purchased an exercise ball (65cm) from Wal-Mart last year intending to sometimes sit on it as a computer chair, thinking it would promote better posture etc. I ended up using it more as a "rebounder" - sometimes bouncing on it twice a day for 10 mins. When I do this, I get the same detoxification symptoms as I used to get when I had a mini-trampoline. Since rebounding is effective even when the subject can't do it themselves (they can just sit on mini-trampoline and have someone else do the bouncing for them), then I think this (sitting on and bouncing on this ball) is another valid way. It's fun too, and can be turned into a gentle workout if you put on some music and work your arms at the same time as you are bouncing.

Anyone else tried this?

*+* KMD *+*



Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball

Posted by Maria Bliss [4.275] on July 10, 2004 at 05:47:14:

In Reply to: Rebounding on an exercise ball posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 02:15:55:

Hi KMD

Thats a great idea!

Btw, what detoxification symptoms do you get?



Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball

Posted by Happygal [2070.350] on July 10, 2004 at 06:57:26:

In Reply to: Rebounding on an exercise ball posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 02:15:55:

Hi KMD,

I had a client who wanted to substitute bouncing on a ball for rebounding, so I posted a message here about it. People responded telling me that it's helpful on a fit ball, but you get more of an effect with rebounding on a minitrampoline. My client started bouncing on a ball, but later brought in an article telling about the benefits of rebounding and I think he eventually got a mini-trampoline.

Do what works! Isn't bouncing great! I very rarely miss a day.

Best wishes to you,
Jan



Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball (HAPPYGAL)

Posted by Maria Bliss [4.275] on July 10, 2004 at 08:21:44:

In Reply to: Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball posted by Happygal [2070.350] on July 10, 2004 at 06:57:26:

Hi Happygal

What benefits are you/do you experience from rebounding? Could you give me a brief synopsis?

I need a bit of encouragement and motivation to get me started again. ;-)



Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball

Posted by Michele [6.15] on July 10, 2004 at 09:07:43:

In Reply to: Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball posted by Happygal [2070.350] on July 10, 2004 at 06:57:26:

Hi Happygal,

Other than bouncing on the rebounder (also, how long do you do it daily?) what other forms of exercise (if any)do you do?

I have a rebounder but didn't feel much different after 15 minutes than when I do other activity; so I'm trying to figure out if it' simply another "form" of exercise of if I am doing something wrong (with the rebounder) or right (with my other forms)
Michele




Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball

Posted by Walt Stoll [9.8] on July 10, 2004 at 10:27:39:

In Reply to: Rebounding on an exercise ball posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 02:15:55:

Hi, KMD.

Listen to Happygal since that is precisely what I would have said.

Walt

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Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball

Posted by maryb [516.1077] on July 10, 2004 at 12:02:52:

In Reply to: Rebounding on an exercise ball posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 02:15:55:

Seems like that could be hard on your spine, eventually, in a way that
standing-up rebounding would not be. While sitting, you don't have your
lower body to help absorb the shock of the bounce, even if you're on a
forgiving surface. I guess if the bounce is gentle enough, it wouldn't matter
so much. I'm all for anything that gets you moving!



Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball

Posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 13:32:31:

In Reply to: Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball posted by Maria Bliss [4.275] on July 10, 2004 at 05:47:14:

Hate to say it but, bad breath, increased perspiration (all day and night) and body odor - none of which I suffer from normally! And I do mean it is a sudden and fairly intense effect whenever I re-start rebounding after not doing it for awhile. It's awful LOL, but clears up in a week if you keep doing it.

He who detoxeth doth stinketh! lol

*+* KMD *+*

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Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball

Posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 13:34:20:

In Reply to: Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball posted by Happygal [2070.350] on July 10, 2004 at 06:57:26:

Thanks Jan - do you remember why the mini-trampoline was said to be more effective? I used to have one but the springs wore out over time and we got rid of it. My birthday is coming up - maybe I will ask for a new one :-)

*+* KMD *+*



How rebounding works

Posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 13:45:09:

In Reply to: Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball posted by Michele [6.15] on July 10, 2004 at 09:07:43:

Walt and my new upcoming book, "Beyond Disease Care" has a chapter about Rebounding. The chapter explains that while it CAN be used as an aerobic activity by doing it more vigorously, this has nothing to do with how the detoxification benefits of rebounding work.

The benefits of rebounding have to do with the up and down motion itself, and only very gently bouncing is required (your feet don't even need to lift off the surface.) The reciprocal up and down motion facilitates the release of toxins from the body tissues and speeds their transport, via the lymph system, to locations where they can exit the body.

This has to do with the fact that most human body tissues exist in the amorphous (liquid) form of the fat and protein makeup of the body. Proteins become more thoroughly amorphous at two gravities (2-G) and tend to crystalize (become solid) at zero gravities (0-G). Rebounding converts the body's proteins from 2-G (the bottom of the bounce) to 0-G (the top of the bounce). Just like water tends to purify itself during crystallization, so too, the toxins tied up in amorphous protein tend to be released when the molecule becomes crystalline.

The up and down motion of rebounding also dramatically facilitates more efficient lymphoid circulation. Each conversion causes the molecules to release more of the bound toxins into the blood and thereby to the liver the major detoxification organ of the bodymind. It is during this release that the toxins become amenable to the lymphoid drainage.

More detail is given in the chapter.

*+* KMD *+*



Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball

Posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 13:49:16:

In Reply to: Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball posted by maryb [516.1077] on July 10, 2004 at 12:02:52:

I never thought of that - interesting poing! Maybe it depends on if you have any spinal conditions. I was thinking when I bought it that it would strengthen my lower back and ab muscles to sit, bounce, and balance on the ball, and I didn't think of the gentle compression of the spine with each bounce done sitting down.

So far, no pain or discomfort with it and since I don't have a mini-trampoline anymore hopefully its better than nothing!

*+* KMD *+*




Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball

Posted by maryb [516.1077] on July 10, 2004 at 15:06:31:

In Reply to: Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 13:49:16:

Well, for sure you are developing your core stability by using the ball, &
getting some action going in your lymph system. That probably outweighs
the possible risk to the spine, if there even is any. Just notice if you feel any
twinges in your back, over time, associated with the bouncing. If you aren't
landing hard, it's probably no big deal.

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Re: How rebounding works

Posted by Michele [15.15] on July 10, 2004 at 15:34:23:

In Reply to: How rebounding works posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 13:45:09:

My question is (I hope you can answer, you seem very knowledged on this!) is that does all exercise do this or only rebounding..I was under the impression that all cells release when their is energy needs... how does it DIFFER from traditional exercise?



Re: How rebounding works

Posted by Michele [15.15] on July 10, 2004 at 15:36:01:

In Reply to: How rebounding works posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 13:45:09:

Also, does the book have actual studies stated for reference? I'm into clinical, proven research; and by stating the above, it still doesn't tell me why or if this is different than anything else. It sounds like a chemistry lesson, which may or may not include other forms.

That's what I'm trying to find out. Maybe I will search the web for studies comparing the two and report back IF I find anything that would be of help that already isn't on the board :)



Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball

Posted by Michele [15.15] on July 10, 2004 at 15:37:08:

In Reply to: Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 13:49:16:

Anything where one must balance (yoga, weightlifting etc) will help the muscles that stabalize the spine/hips...

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Re: How rebounding works

Posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 16:19:16:

In Reply to: Re: How rebounding works posted by Michele [15.15] on July 10, 2004 at 15:36:01:

The reference I have from Walt for the book is "The New Miracles of Rebounding Exercise" by Albert E. Carter. Since I don't have this book, I can't tell you what studies, if any, it may contain.

How is rebounding different from any other exercise? It is the up and down motion that causes the conversions that facilitate the detoxification of the lymphs, which is unique to rebounding. Except for possibly jumping up and down off the ground for 10 minutes twice a day (which would be hard on the body), I don't think any other exercise can do what rebounding does, specifically.

Another way to phrase it would be to say that these particular benefits of rebounding (lymph detoxification) have nothing to do with it being "exercise". If you rebound vigorously to get into your aerobic THR, then you are killing 2 birds with one stone.



Re: How rebounding works

Posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 16:20:40:

In Reply to: Re: How rebounding works posted by Michele [15.15] on July 10, 2004 at 15:34:23:

I just responded to your other comment and hopefully it contains the answers you seek.



Forgot to mention - rebounding for emphysema

Posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 16:24:49:

In Reply to: Re: How rebounding works posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 16:20:40:

Walt has also sited the following, though unfortunately he didn't save the article. It could probably be found with some research effort:

"In the late 70s or early 80s, the physical therapy department at the University of Michigan Medical School reported that the mild up and down motion from very gentle rebounding on a mini-trampoline significantly improved both the functional breathing capacity and the pulmonary function of patients with severe emphysema. This improvement was separate from the exercise portion of this motion since someone else could do the bouncing while the patient simply sat in the middle of the trampoline."

*+* KMD *+*

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Re: How rebounding works

Posted by Michele [20.15] on July 10, 2004 at 17:09:17:

In Reply to: Re: How rebounding works posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 16:19:16:

OK...I get it. However, what does the up and down movement do specifically ... I do have a rebounder (just bought to try it out) so I guess I'll try it and see myself :)

10 minutes, 2 x a day, right?



Re: How rebounding works

Posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 17:59:35:

In Reply to: Re: How rebounding works posted by Michele [20.15] on July 10, 2004 at 17:09:17:

"However, what does the up and down movement do specifically" Did you see the last 2 paragraphs in my earlier post in this thread (How rebounding works) - about the 0-G and 2-G, etc?

Additionally, here's more from my/Walt's book: "Each conversion causes the molecules to release more of the bound toxins into the blood and thereby to the liver the major detoxification organ of the bodymind. It is during this release that the toxins become amenable to the lymphoid drainage. Although most toxins go directly to the liver via the blood, the lymphatic system drains some of the toxins to the cisterna chyli (a large pocket in the lower chest/upper abdomen), which empties into the right atrium of the heart. The heart then takes it to the skin, lungs, and kidneys for excretion. Whatever the liver cannot detoxify is excreted via the bile into the gut, or leaked back into the blood. This is why boosting detoxification pathways in and to the liver is so important." (Reference The New Miracles of Rebounding Exercise by Albert E. Carter.)

10 minutes twice a day is the MINIMUM effective time. More is better but over 6 times a day will bring diminishing returns. Hope this helps. Be prepared to stink for a few days!

*+* KMD *+*



Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball

Posted by Happygal [2070.350] on July 10, 2004 at 20:36:33:

In Reply to: Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 13:34:20:

Hi KMD,

I think, if I remember correctly, that it was something about the circulation didn't happen as well since the body was bent at the hips.

Best wishes,
Jan



Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball

Posted by Happygal [2070.350] on July 10, 2004 at 20:41:24:

In Reply to: Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball posted by Michele [6.15] on July 10, 2004 at 09:07:43:

Hi Michele,

I bounce for 15 minutes a day, first thing in the morning. I hold two pound weights in each of my hands (but I don't really do anything with them). The one thing it absolutely does for me is gently loosen up all the muscles in my body, and the weights seem to facilitate loosening up of the shoulder and neck muscles.

I walk almost every day from 1/2 mile to 3 miles. I also stretch, 2 - 4 times a week.

I have been dabbling with a little bit of yoga, a little bit of aerobics (walkaerobics) and I have quite a few Pilates videotapes, which I haven't used yet. I also got some videocycle videotapes to use with the stationary bicycle -- they are so much fun.

However I've been slowed down a bit with the liver problem so I haven't been able to increase the amount of exercise I am doing yet. I still want to do aerobics 3 times a week but haven't been able to get there yet -- but I will!!

Walt said rebounding and other forms of exercise are like apples and oranges -- very different in the results they give.

I know I just feel better when I rebound. Maybe try it for a month and see if you notice a difference?

Best wishes,
Jan



Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball (HAPPYGAL)

Posted by Happygal [2070.350] on July 10, 2004 at 20:44:18:

In Reply to: Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball (HAPPYGAL) posted by Maria Bliss [4.275] on July 10, 2004 at 08:21:44:

Hi Maria Bliss,

From rebounding, I feel very good! The rebounding especially loosens up my neck and shoulder muscles and it just makes me feel good. If I don't rebound for even one day, I don't feel as happy!

I hold two pound weights in my hands when I rebound but don't really move them around much -- I just let the extra weight bounce too and loosen up my shoulders and neck. Feels so good.

I just feel better when I do it ...

Try it you'll like it... :o)

Best wishes,
Jan

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Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball

Posted by Michele [20.15] on July 10, 2004 at 21:40:40:

In Reply to: Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball posted by Happygal [2070.350] on July 10, 2004 at 20:41:24:

I am going to try it and see if I notice a difference. I already do yoga, pilates, and teach classical dance; do weights and weight machines.... however, I have not run per my knee (overuse injury) and felt rebounding may be right for me right now (almost a "jog" on rebounder maybe)...
Looking forward to trying it out! Thanks for your input!

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STINK?!

Posted by Michele [20.15] on July 10, 2004 at 21:41:14:

In Reply to: Re: How rebounding works posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 17:59:35:

From sweat or toxins?!



Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball

Posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 23:39:48:

In Reply to: Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball posted by Happygal [2070.350] on July 10, 2004 at 20:36:33:

Makes sense! Thanks Jan :-)

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Re: STINK?!

Posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 23:41:08:

In Reply to: STINK?! posted by Michele [20.15] on July 10, 2004 at 21:41:14:

Stinky toxins eminating from breath and body! Whew ...



Re: How rebounding works (Archive.)

Posted by Walt Stoll [9.8] on July 11, 2004 at 05:56:32:

In Reply to: How rebounding works posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 13:45:09:

Thanks,KMD.

Walt

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Re: STINK?!

Posted by Michele [6.15] on July 11, 2004 at 07:43:23:

In Reply to: Re: STINK?! posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 23:41:08:

I am so glad you told me that....Now I know that my first week I should not have any important meetings planned OR I should be using lot's O' vinegar in my bath to neurtralize my stench.

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Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball

Posted by Cindy J. [1848.32] on July 11, 2004 at 09:38:53:

In Reply to: Rebounding on an exercise ball posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 02:15:55:

I am very fit and VERY active and so I guess I would rather do step aerobics, jogging, and/or boxing to get the up and down motion. I think the rebounding thing is mainly for those who have conditions that prevent them from working out and need something alternative. I really don't see the difference from the bouncing up and down on a rebounder and the bouncing you get from working out - except that the rebounder would be easier on the knees, etc. So, if you don't have knee, joint or similar issues, other exercises would give the same result and also give you more of a workout.



Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball

Posted by KMD [517.155] on July 11, 2004 at 12:49:16:

In Reply to: Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball posted by Cindy J. [1848.32] on July 11, 2004 at 09:38:53:

What you say is true as far as getting a "workout" goes but not as far as the benefits which are unique to rebounding - see my other posts in this thread about "How rebounding works". The benefits specific to rebounding have nothing to do with it being "exercise"!

*+* KMD *+*



Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball

Posted by Cindy J. [1848.32] on July 11, 2004 at 18:57:13:

In Reply to: Re: Rebounding on an exercise ball posted by KMD [517.155] on July 11, 2004 at 12:49:16:

Right - I get that - but I am talking about exercises that give that up and down motion that you are talking about. That is why I said step aerobics, jogging, and boxing. That way you get the up and down thing as well as exercise.

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Re: How rebounding works

Posted by WOW [1317.457] on July 12, 2004 at 00:31:52:

In Reply to: How rebounding works posted by KMD [517.155] on July 10, 2004 at 13:45:09:

Hi KMD,
If it has to do with up-down motion, would rope jumping do the same?

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