Tendonitis/Bursitis historical posts January 1998

Re: tendonitis vs busitis

Posted by Ruby Donovan on September 03, 1997 at 23:30:08:


I have been suffering and going to an M.D. and an Orthopaedic for about one year. From each of the above doctors I received a cortisone shot. After 3 or 4 months, the pain is back. On recommendation of my son, last week I went to a chiropractor. My shoulder feels better after two treatments (adjustments); my upper arm is still sore, but the pain is less. He cupped his hands under my bent elbow and forced the upper-arm bone into place into the shoulder socket and continues to adjust C-3 and T-4.




Re: tendonitis vs busitis

Posted by Walt Stoll on September 04, 1997 at 14:15:04:

In Reply to: Re: tendonitis vs busitis posted by Ruby Donovan on September 03, 1997 at 23:30:08:

Dear Ruby,

Thanks for your reminding us about Chiropractic. Any kind of manipulation is likely to be helpful in this condition. For those in which Chiropractic is not curative, I would suggest again considering Rolfing. Between the two of them------

Walt



Re: tendonitis vs busitis

Posted by Barb Moore on September 09, 1997 at 15:11:47:

In Reply to: Re: tendonitis vs busitis posted by Ruby Donovan on September 03, 1997 at 23:30:08:

Ruby- Thanks for taking the time to reply to my post. You're absolutely right about chiropractic. About 15 years ago my bursitis was "healed" by a chiropractor but I drifted away from him over the years. I started seeing another one whose office was more "convenient". Dumb me. The convenient fellow was unable to help my shoulder problem, but your letter inspired me to track down the first fellow. Guess what! Yup- he's cured me again! Can't believe the improvement after one treatment. Expect to go one or two more times. I've vowed to never leave this guy again even if he moves his practice to China. There's a lesson here somewhere.
Again thanks for your input. But I do intend to pursue Walt's suggestion and learn more about Rolfing.

Barb



Re: tendonitis vs busitis

Posted by Brent Campbell on October 06, 1997 at 19:34:00:

In Reply to: Re: tendonitis vs busitis posted by Barb Moore on September 09, 1997 at 15:11:47:


My Nana has tendonitis of the shoulder and i was wondering if any of you people could tell me how to tell her to treat it. It's hurts to put her arm over her head, or any other time she moves it. She's had acupuncture and been to a chiropractor but it doesn't seen to do much good. Please help me here with some ideas.
Thanks


Re: tendonitis vs busitis

Posted by Walt Stoll on October 07, 1997 at 10:14:37:

In Reply to: Re: tendonitis vs busitis posted by Brent Campbell on October 06, 1997 at 19:34:00:

Dear Brent,

How old is your Nana? This kind of bursitis is ALWAYS associated with a tendonitis of the tendon that runs right under this bursa.

The same things cause this as causes chronic fibromyositis & a brief description of that is on the homepage of my website.

If I had this (I wouldn't because I know what causes it & wouldn't let this happen.) I would consider a Rolfing Consult which would probably resolve THIS problem in a couple of sessions. However, without learning WHY she got this--& doing something about that--it will just come back (or something just as bad or worse).

If you think she is willing to learn a lot about this & actually do something about it, I would be happy to answer her questions & offer her the references she will need to get started. This is something YOU can not do for her--much as you may want to. Until she makes THAT kind of commitment, we both are wasting our efforts.

Walt





Re: tendonitis vs busitis

Posted by Judith M. Harrington on October 31, 1997 at 13:53:13:

In Reply to: Re: tendonitis vs busitis posted by Brent Campbell on October 06, 1997 at 19:34:00:

It would be of value to determine what particular muscle unit of the rotator cuff is causing the problem. A good way to determine this is my passive, active passive and resistive test done by a good licensed massage therapist. This could also be a dics problem. You would have a good idea of the ailment by process of elimantion.


Re: tendonitis

Posted by Me on December 10, 1997 at 15:43:32:

i have tendonitis in both wrists down my forearm. i got it from lifting wieghts about 4 years ago. i have recently tried to get back into lifting weights and it has reactivated my tendonitis...Is there a cure. I dont want to take ibuprophen for the rest of my life.



Re: tendonitis

Posted by Walt Stoll on December 10, 1997 at 17:15:04:

In Reply to: Re: tendonitis posted by Me on December 10, 1997 at 15:43:32:

Dear Me,

You need to get an intracellular magnesium done at a competent lab for that procedure. Please see the responses about torticollis today (perhaps called neck dystonia). Next, you need to start taking an easily absorbed form of magnesium (aspartate or glycinate) at least 1000 milligrams a day along with 200 millligrams of vitamin B6 daily. This would all work better if you were also taking a balanced B complex 100 daily.

Finally, to prevent recurrence, you need to learn an effective skilled relaxation technique & practice it at least 20 minutes twice a day--never less than 2 hours before retiring. In the long run, that is probably the only thing you will have to continue to prevent recurrence.

As you get well, please share your experiences with the rest of the BB participants.

Walt



Re: tendonitis

Posted by Walt Stoll on December 13, 1997 at 11:53:17:


Dear T.W.,

Thanks for the info. You are emphasizing what I have been trying to say for a long time: 1. One's bodymind is, by far, the most accurate determination as to whether something like this will work for that individual and; 2. Different companies make very different qualities of this substance.

Asking a local veterinarian about which company is best is a good idea since vets have used this for a long time. Also, animal practice tends to cut out the placebo effect.

Walt


shoulder pain., only when using mouse!

Posted by Eleanor Nelson on January 01, 1998 at 16:56:10:

I used to get a sharp pain in right shoulder when
painting and papering. I get it now using my mouse. Can anyone help? I am a typist and need to work!
Pain is acute when working, in fact, have to stop but when I quit, it goes away? What have I got?
HELP????


Re: shoulder pain., only when using mouse!

Posted by Deryk Bramwell on January 01, 1998 at 20:05:28:

In Reply to: shoulder pain., only when using mouse! posted by Eleanor Nelson on January 01, 1998 at 16:56:10:

Hello Eleanor,

I suspect that a couple of the chiropractors who monitor this list will give you some good tips,
Until that time:
I avoid the mouse as much as possible for the same reason
I have stared to use a wrist pad so that my shoulder/deltoid is not constantly under tension as it supports my arm
I consciously work at keeping my elbows on the chair arms in my office and study
You know I am sure the correct positioning of chair/table height etc.
Try some of the relaxtion and Stress Reduction advocated here.

Good luck, Deryk Bramwell


Re: shoulder pain., only when using mouse!

Posted by David Ferguson, D.C. on January 01, 1998 at 23:32:05:

In Reply to: shoulder pain., only when using mouse! posted by Eleanor Nelson on January 01, 1998 at 16:56:10:

Most of the patients I have seen with this sort of problem have a shoulder that is slighetly more "rounded" on that side. Thus, the tracking of the rotator cuff tendons is incorrect resulting in inflamation of those tendons and pain.

No way of discerning the exact problem without knowing more about where it hurts exactly and in what motions, etc. However almost all problems that are not from direct trauma seem to be related to this shoulder "rounding".

To help you first need to stretch the pectoral muscles on that side by contracting the back muscles(rhomboids especially). A massage of both the pectoralis major and minor, the rhomboids, trapezius.....chest and back basically. Then you need to avoid rounding that shoulder. Move closer to the mouse. Like Deryk said, avoid doing what hurts! Stop sleeping on that shoulder more than the other. Stretch your shoulders back often throughout the day, especially in the morning and evening.

It takes time for the inflammation to decrease and the tendon to heal so even while you are doing all these things it will seem as if you aren't getting anywhere fast. It just takes awhile. Once it feels better(about a week or so) keep doing these things periodically.

Once the tendons are tracking correctly you will avoid the recurrence of this almost totally.

If this doesn't seem to work, or aggravates the shoulder, you will need to have the shoulder examined. A chiropractor who does a lot of extremity work should be of great help. Just ask around or call local chiropractors for info about whether or not they do extremity work.

Good luck, write back if you want any more info.

BTW I had this problem once and it's amazing how much it hurts/burns in that shoulder.


Re: shoulder pain., only when using mouse!

Posted by Walt Stoll on January 02, 1998 at 11:39:22:

In Reply to: Re: shoulder pain., only when using mouse! posted by David Ferguson, D.C. on January 01, 1998 at 23:32:05:

Dear Doc Dave,

I KNEW you would have something substantive to offer here. THANKS!

The Rolfing I mentioned is just a way of having someone else get the "tracking" you mentioned accomplished without the discipline you mentioned. Any Rolfer worth his/her salt would tell anyone, for whom they had relieved symptoms, to do the same thing you mentioned or the relief would not be permanent.

Namaste` Walt



Re: shoulder pain., only when using mouse!

Posted by Nancy on January 06, 1998 at 19:56:43:

In Reply to: shoulder pain., only when using mouse! posted by Eleanor Nelson on January 01, 1998 at 16:56:10:

Eleanor
My computer is on a kitchen counter-type desk which has two narrow drawers under both sides of it. I pull out the right side drawer and put a neck pillow on it to rest my arm on and a have a mouse pad with an elevated portion for my wrist. I have never had a problem with my shoulder from the mouse and I have fibromyalgia. Matter of fact, I had a frozen (left) shoulder a few years ago and am very susceptible to tendonitis in alot of places. Good luck. I hope you find a solution that works for you


Rotator cuff tendonitis

Posted by Dave O'Dowd on January 20, 1998 at 13:53:24:

I am at my wits end. I develop rotator cuff tendonitis (supraspinatus tendonitis, PT person told me it's the biceps tendon in particular) slowly starting in April of last year. Finally stopped doing my tradtional workouts and droped sets and weight. Did not get better and ocassionally felt sharp pain in shoulder when pushing against heavy objects. Went to doc in early August, took X-ray, gave me the rotator cuff Dx. Went for about 6 PT sessions, learned stretches. Didn't really get much better - took 5 weeks off. Got a lot better, began to ramp up on work out with no pain. Got worse again, and has not gotten better. Have done nothing for the last two weeks and seems to be getting worse over the last three days. Seems if I work out or don't, it still is sore and there appears to be no pattern and cannot figure out what exercies I can and can't do. I'm really frustrated and getting depressed about it. What should I do now? No one I speak with seems to know, or I get conflicting advice.


Re: Rotator cuff tendonitis

Posted by David Ferguson, D.C. on January 20, 1998 at 18:39:43:

In Reply to: Rotator cuff tendonitis posted by Dave O'Dowd on January 20, 1998 at 13:53:24:

The biceps is not one of the rotatorcuff muscles. (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis)

If it is a rotator cuff problem then you need to, not only give it the rest(which you have done once already), but also change what is causing the problem to start with. A shoulder that is "rounded" forward will cause the tendons to track incorrectly in the grooves and put irregular stress on the insertion of those tendons. Stretching and massage of the pectoralis major and minor along with rhomboid and mid trapezius strengthening will get you started. Stop rounding the shoulder when doing things like sleeping on your side, eating, writing, driving, etc..

A chiropractor may be necessary to make the biomechanical changes needed. Rolfing would also be a good thing to look into. Skilled relaxation will help keep you healthy in the future.

Again, this is if the problem is actually in the rotator cuff. My advice would be to go see a chirropractor in your area who deals with extremity problems and consult with them and get an examination. Then, hopefully, you will know what the problem really is. As Dr. Stoll can attest the medical education regarding musculo-skeletal conditions is put on the back burner, internal conditions are the main focus. You need someone who not only deals with the problem on a daily basis but actually gets people well from it.


Re: Rotator cuff tendonitis

Posted by Walt Stoll on January 22, 1998 at 10:48:36:

In Reply to: Rotator cuff tendonitis posted by Dave O'Dowd on January 20, 1998 at 13:53:24:

Dear Dave,

The REAL crime is that with all these specialists treating you, apparently no one has told you that your learning (and practicing at least 20 minutes twice a day) an effective skilled relaxation technique is ESSENTIAL for permanent resolution of this condition. WHY NOT?

Also, you would get a lot of temporary relief (several weeks) by getting a deep, total body, therapeutic massage 3 times a week for 2 weeks. The main reason to do that is that your benefits would convince you that I know of what I speak & you would be more likely to follow up on any other, more permanent, suggestions I might have.

You could get more prolonged relief (a year or so) by getting a full Rolfing session (10 sessions). However, neither the Rolfing or the massages benefits would be permanent without the skilled relaxation.

Essential oils, intracellular magnesium & vitamin B6 are also important. If you want to see how that works together your best bet would be to read a copy of my book (link below).

THEN, if you still have questions, write again.

As you get well, please share your experiences with the rest of the BB participants since there are millions of people out there going through exactly what you are experiencing--needlessly.

Walt



Re: tendonitis

Posted by Robin Burton on January 25, 1998 at 10:43:18:

In Reply to: Re: tendonitis posted by Me on December 10, 1997 at 15:43:32:

I injured my elbow 3 weeks ago while playing golf. At
the time I did not think the injury was bad, but since
that time the pain is increasing, and moving into my
fingers. I have seen an orthopedic surgeon, and recieved
an injection, it only masked the symptoms for a while.
do you have any suggestions?




Re: tendonitis

Posted by Walt Stoll on January 27, 1998 at 11:59:53:

In Reply to: Re: tendonitis posted by Robin Burton on January 25, 1998 at 10:43:18:

Dear Robin,

In my response to you, back in December, I would have been remiss if I did not predict these kind of problems in your future if you did not take the time to become an expert in what IS known about chronic conditions like this.

What have you done , so far, to get into the things I recommended back then?

Walt



Re: shoulder pain., only when using mouse!

Posted by Curtis McKallip Jr. on January 30, 1998 at 15:50:27:

In Reply to: Re: shoulder pain., only when using mouse! posted by Nancy on January 06, 1998 at 19:56:43:

Yoga helped me recover from RSI caused by keyboarding.

Curtis.


1998: Jan Feb

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