Tinea Versicolor archives

Skin Fungus

Posted by PeggyH on August 31, 1998 at 22:55:03:

I have a couple patches of skin fungus, between breasts and on my back. I know this is because of candida. Aside from the wellness program I've begun, is there anything you'd suggest to get rid of these patches now?

When this first showed up years ago, I was given 2 pills, one taken immediately and the other taken two weeks later. Years later I was given the same treatment again and told to use Selsun Blue couple times a week as maintenance. At that time I had no idea what this fungus was all about and, apparently, neither did the doctors. I was told that it just overgrows on some people.

Thank you,

PeggyH



Follow Ups:


Re: Skin Fungus

Posted by Walt Stoll on September 01, 1998 at 11:10:46:

In Reply to: Skin Fungus posted by PeggyH on August 31, 1998 at 22:55:03:

Dear PeggyH,

This may be "tinea versacolor". This is a very common superficial fungus of this distribution. Selsun is the typical treatment for it and would not resolve candida.

The trick, like many chronic conditions, is for the doc to take the time to explain HOW to use the treatment so that it will be a permanent cure.

You need a specific diagnosis. Once you have that, let me know.

REMEMBER, fungi only live on dead things. The superficial layers of your skin are dead. Since NO treatment kills fungi, you have to treat any skin fungus for at least a month (the length of time it takes to grow all the already infected skin off the body (very similar to the explanation about the nail fungus).

Less than adequate treatments will usually help. However, the condition nearly always comes back for the same reasons is came in the first place.

Once I know your actual diagnosis, perhaps I can help you understand what it would take to have this time be your last time.

Walt



Follow Ups:


I got a diagnosis ...

Posted by PeggyH on September 02, 1998 at 17:26:49:

In Reply to: Re: Skin Fungus posted by Walt Stoll on September 01, 1998 at 11:10:46:

The doctor said a fungal infection would have a clearing in the middle and redness around the edge of the clearing. That's not what I have. Mine are tannish patches that crop up during hot, sweaty weather. I think they turn more red when I'm hot and sweaty, but then go back to tan. He called it eczema (sp?). He also mentioned psoriasis. Are these the same thing? He decided definitely on the exczema though.

He prescribed Lomisil and Elocon. What do you think? Does this have nothing to do with my Candida?

Thank you so much,

PeggyH




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Re: I got a diagnosis ...

Posted by Pam on September 02, 1998 at 20:51:58:

In Reply to: I got a diagnosis ... posted by PeggyH on September 02, 1998 at 17:26:49:

Peggy,

I have tinea versicolor. It sound exactly like what you describe. Walt knows better than I do on this, but I believe the doc has to be looking for this specifically. Maybe you could help him by suggesting he check for it. In my experience, that means scraping some of the affected skin off and looking at it under a microscope. By the way, it recurs often and easily if you don't clear it up and I was told that I could pick it up again from wearing clothes that still carried it in the fibers. Is that true Walt?

Good luck.
Pam


Follow Ups:


Re: I got a diagnosis ...(I'll bet!)

Posted by Walt Stoll on September 03, 1998 at 09:38:44:

In Reply to: I got a diagnosis ... posted by PeggyH on September 02, 1998 at 17:26:49:

Dear PeggyH,

I think you went to the wrong doc. There is only one fungus infection (called ringworm) that has a clearing in the middle). There are many kinds of fungi and each rash looks different. From what you are describing now, this is Tinea Versicolor. Definitely not eczema and likely not candida either.

The stuff he prescribed is a "shotgun treatment" designed to help the majority of skin conditions regardless of what they are. If he has a habit of doing that, he is not concerned about making a diagnosis at all.

Go to the library (if you have a medical library close to you that would be best) and have them find you a dermatology atlas with color pictures. Look up & read about tinea versacolor. THEN, if that does not accurately describe what you have (picture & text) look at ALL the fungus infections.

I need an accurate disgnosis to help. Too bad you chose such a doc as you did.

Walt





Follow Ups:


Re: I got a diagnosis ...

Posted by Walt Stoll on September 03, 1998 at 09:56:46:

In Reply to: Re: I got a diagnosis ... posted by Pam on September 02, 1998 at 20:51:58:

Dear Pam,

Peggy would have done better going to you. You know more about this than the doc she ended up going to.

Tinea Versocolor is one of the easiest diagnoses to make AND one of the easiest to treat. Just think what a diagnostician this doc must be for things that are hard to diagnose!

Thanks, Walt




Re: I got a diagnosis ...(I'll bet!)

Posted by PH on September 03, 1998 at 11:22:35:

In Reply to: Re: I got a diagnosis ...(I'll bet!) posted by Walt Stoll on September 03, 1998 at 09:38:44:

Walt,

I did keep pressing him with questions. Upon my pressing, he wanted to look at my patches a 2nd time, even got out a rubber glove to touch them. I definitely had the feeling he didn't know what he was talking about. One plus for him, he gave me nystatin powder without a hassle.

Unfortunately, I don't have much choice since I have an HMO. I'll keep working at it.

Thanks,
Peggy





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Now I have the real diagnosis...

Posted by PeggyH on September 03, 1998 at 16:12:45:

In Reply to: Re: I got a diagnosis ...(I'll bet!) posted by Walt Stoll on September 03, 1998 at 09:38:44:

Hi Walt,

OK, I checked it out at the library and this is DEFINITELY tinea versacolor. They could put ME under the description, I fit it perfectly.

Do you know of a permanent solution?

Thanks to you and Pam too,

Peggy




Follow Ups:


Re: I got a diagnosis ...(I'll bet!)

Posted by Walt Stoll on September 04, 1998 at 10:43:06:

In Reply to: Re: I got a diagnosis ...(I'll bet!) posted by PH on September 03, 1998 at 11:22:35:

Dear Peggy,

REMEMBER! By far the biggest cost of illness is NOT the monetary cost. MDs use HMOs to try to force people to use ONLY conventional medicine. It works pretty well doesn't it?!

If this IS tinea versacolor, the treatment is Selsun Blue applied over the area and left on overnight (messy) for at least a month. You have to prevent it from growing while the skin replaces itself.

In the meantime, sterilize your clothes and bedsheets (toward the end of the treatment).

In the long run, wellness will make you resistant enough that NO amount of exposure will cause it to recur. Why don't the rest of us have it???? The fungus spores are everywhere.

REMEMBER, this is IF this is Tinea Versicolor. The diagnosis is easy if the doc is willing to do what s/he is trained to do.

Walt



Follow Ups:


Re: Now I have the real diagnosis...

Posted by Walt Stoll on September 04, 1998 at 11:18:33:

In Reply to: Now I have the real diagnosis... posted by PeggyH on September 03, 1998 at 16:12:45:

Hi, Peggy.

Now you see one of the reasons they felt they had to take my license, It was too embarassing to have to live up to my standards. Why should I be able to diagnose you without even seeing you when the doc you saw didn't have a clue?

How could anyone get away with such sloppy practice unless there was a monopoly?

In this case, for example, it is a case of "see one", "do one", "teach one". I will bet that YOU will never miss the diagnosis in anyone you see it in AND that you can cure it as well as any professional just with the information I gave you earlier today.

By keeping the monopoly, the doc got his fee, and the pharmaceutical companies got their cut. That wouldn't be so bad if the diagnosis was appropriate and the treatment effective (SIGH)!

You will be in direct competition with the medical monopoly!

Namaste` Walt



Follow Ups:


Pharmaceutical didn't make anything this time; I didn't fill prescrip. HA! THANKS (NMI)

Posted by PeggyH on September 04, 1998 at 14:58:55:

In Reply to: Re: Now I have the real diagnosis... posted by Walt Stoll on September 04, 1998 at 11:18:33:






Re: Skin Fungus

Posted by DavidO on November 13, 1998 at 14:02:42:

In Reply to: Skin Fungus posted by PeggyH on August 31, 1998 at 22:55:03:

I've recently developed the same fungus (white spots) between my shoulder blades as well. My doctor prescribed Nizoral tablets (2 tablets...then 2 tablets a week later).
I took the first 2 tablets last week and unfortunately nothing has happened. Today I take the other 2 tablets.

Will putting Selsum on the area help? Any other recommendations that you might make?


Follow Ups:


Re: Skin Fungus

Posted by Walt Stoll on November 14, 1998 at 09:56:30:

In Reply to: Re: Skin Fungus posted by DavidO on November 13, 1998 at 14:02:42:

Dear DavidO,

Nizoral is almos tthe last thing that should ever be considered for this innocuous, superficial fungus (Tinea Versicolor). Any doc that would prescribe Nizoral for this should not be in practice.

It takes 4 weeks for the body to replace the skin. The treatment is topical Selsun (or Selsun Blue) twice a day for 4 weeks. NO risk and very little expense. No wonder there are some "docs" who use Nizoral----expensive & dangerous.

Walt




Re: I got a diagnosis ...(I'll bet!)

Posted by Tony H. on November 29, 1998 at 03:58:07:

In Reply to: Re: I got a diagnosis ...(I'll bet!) posted by Walt Stoll on September 04, 1998 at 10:43:06:

Just been reading all the follow ups on tinea versacolor. I was diagnosed this over ten years ago, and not much seemed to be known about treatment then. Last year during my aviation medical, I was prescribed Lamasil tablets. I went on treatment twice, to no avail. Lamasil proved to be very expensive ($60 14 days) and not effective, yet toxic. I see you mention Selsun Blue. However, I believe that regular Selsun has 100% more selenium sulfide and another product Versel is also stronger.

I have been using Versel for years more as a cosmetic fix then a cure due to not having the understanding of how to cure the problem. Works extremly well in that fashion. However, I am now confident that I can cure this problem with Versel from your advice.

Also you are right, I have been able to diagose this problem for several people over the years, when there MD's didn't have a clue

Tony


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Re: I got a diagnosis ...(I'll bet!)

Posted by Tony H on November 29, 1998 at 04:13:35:

In Reply to: Re: I got a diagnosis ...(I'll bet!) posted by Tony H. on November 29, 1998 at 03:58:07:

Now that I have already posted my msg., I have a question. Does Lamasil (pills) and Selenium sufide (Selsun) work in the same way? I am asking this because I was on Lamasil for 6 weeks without any effectiveness. If they work in the same way, such as 30 days for the effected dead layer of skin to fall off, am I doomed no matter what I do?

Thanks

Tony H


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Re: I got a diagnosis ...(I'll bet!)

Posted by Lyndon S on November 29, 1998 at 04:37:21:

In Reply to: Re: I got a diagnosis ...(I'll bet!) posted by Walt Stoll on September 04, 1998 at 10:43:06:

I have read some information on the active ingredient in Selsun Blue, Selenium sulfide. In the case of Tinea Versicolor, the 2.5% reg. Selsun or Versel should be used. The recommended dosage is once a day for 10-15 min. for 7 days. Could you please let me know if it should be 7 or 30 days, and would there be any adverse effects with the later.

Thks

L.S.


Follow Ups:


Re: I got a diagnosis ...(I'll bet!)

Posted by Walt Stoll on November 30, 1998 at 09:41:11:

In Reply to: Re: I got a diagnosis ...(I'll bet!) posted by Tony H. on November 29, 1998 at 03:58:07:

Hi, Tony.

Now that you know why you have to do this this way, I have no doubt that you will be able to finally put this in your past. It apparently is the selenium that does the trick with the Selsun & Selsun Blue. However it is not necessarily true that "if a little selenium is good a lot would be better.

The vast majority of people would be cured with the Selsun Blue (USED CORRECTLY). I have only seen one person who did better with the Selsun than they did with the Selsun Blue and it STILL had to be done as I have described. Since over the counter is SO much less expensive (no cost to the doc and the stuff is less expencsive without the prescription) I always recommend that first.

In this condition it is more how you use it than WHAT you use.

Thanks for the note.

Walt




Re: I got a diagnosis ...(I'll bet!)

Posted by Walt Stoll on November 30, 1998 at 09:47:13:

In Reply to: Re: I got a diagnosis ...(I'll bet!) posted by Tony H on November 29, 1998 at 04:13:35:

Dear Tony,

Lamasil and selenium work totally differently. SO, the failure of one would not have anything to do with a faliure of the other.

It would, however, be important to use either one for the requisite 6 weeks.

NOW, having said that, getting rid of this will NOT prevent a recurrence in a few years. It is your basic immunity that determines your susceptibility to anything like this. These little fungus spores are EVERYWHERE. Why do we not all have it? We all have dead skin cells all over our bodies.

Once this is gone this time, I would not forget the gentle message your bodymind has been sending you all these years. You need to learn something about improving your immune system. The next message may not be so benign.

Walt




Re: I got a diagnosis ...(I'll bet!)

Posted by Walt Stoll on November 30, 1998 at 09:54:21:

In Reply to: Re: I got a diagnosis ...(I'll bet!) posted by Lyndon S on November 29, 1998 at 04:37:21:

Dear Lyndon,

You are reading stuff that was out of date more than 30 years ago. I was in medical school 40 years ago. At that time, they were just switching from recommending prescription Selsun for this condition to just using Selsun Blue (OTC). The expense was much less and the results were virtually identical.

Unfortunately, once out of school, most physicians fell back to ordering the Selsun because they got no income from people using the Selsun Blue. See my other responses today on this subject.

Because of how ALL antifungus agents work (they do not kill the fungus but prevent it growing in new tissue) they ALL have to be used for at least 30 days for the best % cure.

SOME people will resolve this permanently with just 7 days. Those who want to play with the condition might consider trying that. For those who are tired of screwing with it.............

Walt




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