Wellness archives

Not doing the one thing that would help a person

Posted by Jim Marconnet on October 19, 1998 at 14:06:37:

I'm reading Mind as Healer, Mind as Slayer, the new paperback edition. A really good book, actually. :-)

Sure enough, there on pages 194/195 is the answer to what Walt said recently about people *not* doing the one/only thing that would really help them (skilled relaxation).

"Another point to bear in mind is that there is an attitudinal component to meditation which may have a great deal to do with its success or lack thereof for a particular individual.

Those who meditate have chosen to do so. They are self-selected, and by virtue of this, they start out with a positive predisposition toward meditative practice which may not exist among skeptics for whom it is suggested or for whom it remains mystical escapism. Obviously, such a predisposition is going to enhance one's chances of success and make the individual ore likely to practice diligently and experience the cumulative benefits that elude both the dilettante and the skeptic. A person entering into meditation has already in some sense committed himself to an accompaning philosophical belief system...psysiological and attidunal components may combine synergistically and create greater effects than either factor alone."

To put it another way, "Those who WON"T meditate (or do Skilled Relaxation) just won't. And it would not Work for them if they DID try it. Those who WILL, have already started along the path, and are reaping some attitudinal benefits even before they start meditating."

RocketHealer Jim++



Follow Ups:


Re: Not doing the one thing that would help a person

Posted by Walt Stoll on October 20, 1998 at 10:44:29:

In Reply to: Not doing the one thing that would help a person posted by Jim Marconnet on October 19, 1998 at 14:06:37:

Thanks, Jim.

I really can't disagree with anything you have said here except (perhaps a little) your last paragraph. I have a little more faith in "skeptics" than that.

Many people are SO sick, by the time they start looking "elsewhere" that they CANNOT make healthy decisions for themselves. For those people (those adamantely opposed to the idea of skilled relaxaation), it would be best for them to become a student of diet or exercise. By the time they had combined THOSE two, they would become healthy enough that many will actually try some form of skilled relaxation. THEN, the fact that they were already doing the first two would make any success with a relaxation technique work even better. There is no one so powerful as a converted skeptic!

For those who would be embarassed to admit that they were wrong; they might consider pure biofeedback (more acceptable to the western mind). Even though it costs a LOT more than is likely necessary, no one can put a price on "saving face".

I think everyone should read your note since there is so much truth in it.

Namaste` Walt



Follow Ups:


Re: Pure Biofeedback and The Western Mind

Posted by Jim Marconnet on October 20, 1998 at 16:41:55:

In Reply to: Re: Not doing the one thing that would help a person posted by Walt Stoll on October 20, 1998 at 10:44:29:

Walt said: "For those who would be embarassed to admit that they were wrong; they might consider pure biofeedback (more acceptable to the western mind). Even though it costs a LOT more than is likely necessary, no one can put a price on "saving face"."

The "Suggest pure biofeedback" idea sounds wonderful to me. If it is proposed and people consider it and check prices, they will put on their tightwad blinders and logically decide to do skilled relaxation instead--since it is so much less expensive, it can be done at home without traveling or an appointment, etc. etc. It's sort of like starting bidding out at a high price you know no one will pay. It makes the price of the real solution seem like a real bargain.

About the Western Mind, I have learned a few things about paranormal (some call it Spiritual) healing in an attempt to help my dear wife with numerous chronic health problems which no amount of allopathic medical care helped. Had I discovered your web site first, I might have taken a slightly different path, but the healing "stuff" I've learned is very important anyway. The point I'm trying to get to is that just like skilled relaxation, these Love/Energy healing techniques are usable by just about anyone, anywhere, and are independent of any organized or disorganized religion or dogma, but people are quick to say, "That sounds Eastern!", or "That sounds New Age!" and to reject/discount it. I am hopeful that news of the success of various techniques such as those you so often recommend will continue to "get out" and that people in the West will become more open to what really works, rather than just labeling things Western or Eastern or whatever. Use what works, I say.

RocketHealer Jim++





Follow Ups:


Re: Pure Biofeedback and The Western Mind

Posted by Bob C. on October 21, 1998 at 13:48:00:

In Reply to: Re: Pure Biofeedback and The Western Mind posted by Jim Marconnet on October 20, 1998 at 16:41:55:

CES and Light and Sound machines seem to offer cost-effective alternatives. Michael Hutchinsons book "MEGABRAIN" is incredible on these subjects.




Re: Not doing the one thing that would help a person

Posted by Vicki on October 21, 1998 at 14:15:24:

In Reply to: Not doing the one thing that would help a person posted by Jim Marconnet on October 19, 1998 at 14:06:37:

I jogged for 5 years on the aerobics program when it first came out because my husband wanted me to. It was wonderful for him and I hated almost every minute of it. I'm quite sure that the 5 years of stress doing something I truly did not want to do easily eclipsed any physical benefit I was supposed to get out of it. I believe Jim is right on. You have to want to do something for it to work and the more passionate you are about it the better it will most likely work. Perhaps it's like a lot of other things it's hard to deal with, we have to reach our own version of bottom before we'll give something a chance. When you are used to being sick, you tend to want to hang on to that because it's what you know. Same with being beaten or otherwise abused, we don't know anything else and anything else sounds scary. Moving out of comfort zones no matter how awful they are is truly hard. I applaud anyone who takes those first steps and encourage them to keep trucking forward.



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Re: Not doing the one thing that would help a person

Posted by Walt Stoll on October 22, 1998 at 11:46:02:

In Reply to: Re: Not doing the one thing that would help a person posted by Vicki on October 21, 1998 at 14:15:24:

Thanks, Vicki.

You are right on. It IS the first steps that are the hardest.

However, even if one is forced, as you were, the bodymind still will respond and make the next steps easier. BEST if the person does it willingly but this is NOT a psychological benefit alone.

Walt



Follow Ups:


Re: Not doing the one thing that would help a person

Posted by Vicki on October 22, 1998 at 12:10:16:

In Reply to: Re: Not doing the one thing that would help a person posted by Walt Stoll on October 22, 1998 at 11:46:02:

The five years I jogged were not happy ones for me, but the routine of the regular training set me up for a lifetime of good exercise habits. I started the jogging at 19, kept it up along with other things for several years and once I gave the jogging up went on to things that felt better for me. I never looked back. We divorced after 7 years, but I've always told him he gave me a real gift regarding the habit of regular exercise. I'm 47 now and still going strong in that regard and I'm very glad about it.




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